Application or middleware logs may collect forensic

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outside the execution of the application or middleware. Application or middleware logs may collect forensic data that may duplicate evidence collected by network or system logs. The previous recommendation to "Use sources of evidence from multiple log files whenever possible" provides stronger forensic evidence. Process monitoring, audit and transaction logs/trails etc are usually collected for different purposes than security event logging, and this often means they should be kept separate. The types of events and details collected will tend to be different. For example a PCIDSS audit log will contain a chronological record of activities to provide an independently verifiable trail that permits P a g e 40 | 79
ASSIGNMENT 2 THEORY SPRING 2018reconstruction, review and examination to determine the original sequence of attributable transactions. It is important not to log too much, or too little. Use knowledge of the intended purposes to guide what, when and how much.Logging Cheat Sheet - A System or Security Audit Policy specifies 1)Which type of object and attributes you want to want to collect or log, 2)Which types of object events, e.g. success, failure, add, delete, or change, you want to collect or log,3)The size, retention, location or behaviors of the logs, and Specification of users, groups and type of audit log management and access. 3.2.3 HIPAA Auditing and LoggingHIPAA Auditing and Logging - Auditing and logging are an important part of the HIPAA Security Rule, but there are no prescriptive controls defined. According to HIPAA Security Rule - 164.312(b):" Implement hardware, software, and/or procedural mechanisms that record and examine activity in information systems that contain oruse electronic protected health information."Procedures for monitoring HIPAA log-in attempts.Put simply, what HIPAA boils down to, is that all access, both success and failures, to electronic protected health information (ePHI) should be monitored and logged and be accessible in the case of a breach. You should be able to go back to your HIPAA log and investigate what data was accessed, conduct forensics to try to figure out how that data was accessed in an unauthorized way and who may have been the person or entity that accessed it, and determine if/how data was altered. It’s the "who, what, when, and how of access" that needs to be audited and logged.Auditing is so important because the integrity and availability of data is crucial in healthcare and in HIPAA. When ePHI data changes, is deleted, or is accessed in some unauthorized way, that represents a breach to HIPAA and is something that needs to be tracked both proactive – using alerting and monitoring – as well as reactively, or retroactively, to investigate when an unauthorized breach might have taken place.

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