Frederick taylor the pioneer who developed time and

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Chapter 5 / Exercise 96
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Frederick Taylor, the pioneer who developed time and motion studies and is generally considered to be the father of scientific management provided the impetus around which classical organization theory would evolve according to Shafritz and Hyde in Classics of Public Administration. Scientific management was about efficiency and at its inception was about preserving effort. The transfer of
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Chapter 5 / Exercise 96
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Taylor‘s principles to the field of public administration is another example of the field adapting techniques and concepts from the world of business to governance. One of the four assumptions of Leonard White‘s Introduction to the Study of Public Administration (1926) was that the study of administration should start from the base of management rather than the foundation of law. White, in that assumption about the study of administration from his text, lays a foundation for the basis of administration and lays that foundation at the feet of the field of management. By doing so, and thus impacting the study of the field of public administration from the beginning, White helps loosely connect the field of business and administration through the link of tenets rooted in techniques of management. Another example of the study of administration‘s connection to the field of business is the adoption by the field of public administration of the work of Mary Parker Follett whose contributions on how organizations work in The Giving of Orders, gave insight into the actions of the individual in the organization. For example, Parker Follett, writing in a voice intended for the business community states: Business administration has often to consider how to deal with the dissociated paths in individuals or groups, but the method of doing this successfully have been developed much further in some departments than in others. We have hardly recognized this as part of the technique of dealing with employees, yet the clever salesman knows that it is the chief part of his job. Graham T. Allison, in Public and Private Management: Are They Fundamentally Alike in All Unimportant Respects?, provides an insightful analysis that frames the overall perspective of public management and thus, New Public Management by looking at similarities and differences in public and private management. Allison takes the term management to mean the organization and direction of resources to achieve a desired result. The challenge for both the public and private manager is to integrate the numerous aspects of decision-making so as to achieve results. Allison states that private management success is due, in large part, to an increase in the articulation of a general management point of view and the willingness of managers to absorb that point of view and act upon it in their official functions. Conversely, public management has had to battle the perception that ―common sense alone is enough to achieve acceptable results. In fact, Allison borrows from Rufus Miles in ― The Search for Identity of Graduate Schools in Public Affairs when he states:

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