Defense mechanisms can also be harmful if there are

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Defense mechanisms can also be harmful if: There are too few defenses that can be employed in coping with threats; There is too much superego activity, which causes the use of too many defenses. Conclusion There are two main ways for a person to cope with threats: 1. avoiding, repressing, denying, looking away, escaping from the situation, or letting  someone else take the blame; 2. approaching, learning more, and taking charge. The first method may include the use of defense mechanisms such as denial,  repression/suppression, withdrawal, or projection. The second method may involve use  of the defense mechanisms of rationalization, sublimation, identification, compensation,  and undoing. However, approaching and taking charge of the situation may still be done in unhealthy ways. Generally, the first way reduces  stress , while the second increases chances for coping  with the situation. Thus, the first way is more effective when the situation is beyond our  control, the second way works when there is something that can be done about the  problem. Most people use both ways depending on the situation, but also tend to have a preferred way. Each has its own disadvantages: more stress and worry for the  "approachers" and lack of awareness for the "avoiders." Freud  saw defense mechanisms as necessary, but he considered most of them  negative, the only positive one being sublimation. Many researchers continued with this  view, declaring that most of the defense mechanisms involve lies, and the only thing  they do—especially if used continually—is to create more problems. The main problem with defense mechanisms is that if they are used for a long time they  may become automatic and separate a person from their true feelings and from reality.  However, as has been seen, sublimation, suppression, undoing, and  Regression  can  be used in a healthy way to help solve problems. Other mechanisms that may be helpful in short-term adaptation to a particular situation (but not healthy in the long run) are  intellectualization, repression, displacement, and dissociation. Defense mechanisms are neither good nor bad in themselves. It all depends on how,  and for how long, they are being used. Defense mechanisms are often needed, and  used, to protect ones’ self from pain. However, usually this is a temporary solution, and  eventually one comes to the point when they have to face the real situation. If an  individual refuses to do so, they cross the very thin line between healthy and unhealthy  use of this psychological "painkiller," in the same way that a patient may become  addicted to medical painkillers used to treat physical pain. The ultimate solution, though,
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