Similarly a set of dimension styles should be

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Similarly, a set of dimension styles should be developed to result in similar results, and LTScale, block insertion scales, and other factors affecting the size and shape of various symbols should be planned with the final plot in mind. Making a Paper Space Drawing Generally speaking, the process of making a Paper Space drawing can be simplified by the use of a properly formatted template drawing (*.dwt in AutoCAD R14). While it may contain virtually any amount of "constant" information, a Paper Space template should have, as a minimum, the organization's title block, border (if used), and any other "universal" information - data that will
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appear on every plotted sheet. The title block and related data should be contained entirely in paper space and drawn to the exact size that it will be when plotted, after making allowances for required margins, etc. For example, a typical plotter will permit a border of something like 23"x34.5" on a 24"x36" "D" size sheet, so a good size for a title block and border in this case would be 23"x34.5". Other information that may be contained in a template drawing are such things as pre-defined text styles, dimension styles, and linetypes. While many of these can be defined or loaded by AutoCAD "on the fly," putting them in an "organization standard" template file offers somewhat greater assurance that drafters will adhere to standard practices. Starting a Paper Space drawing is no different starting any drawing, except to be sure that when starting out, the TILEMODE variable is set to 1 (which puts the user "in" Model Space). The drawing is then made in the usual manner, except that the drafter need not worry about such things as "where this sheet starts and ends" or whether what (s)he's working on will fit a sheet when plotted at a particular scale. As mentioned earlier, an entire project can be done in a single drawing file, if desired, and if the file doesn't grow beyond a manageable size. Defining the Paper Space Sheets When the project has progressed to the point that check plots are needed, it's time to think about creating one or more sheets in Paper Space. Step 1 - Switch to Paper Space - This is accomplished with the TILEMODE command. When prompted for a TILEMODE value, enter 0 (zero) or Off. This will set AutoCAD to Paper Space mode; the UCSICON, if displayed, will change to a distinctive triangle, and everything drawn in Model Space will disappear. If the drawing was made on a template having a Paper Space title block and/or border, these items should now be available (if not, then ZOOM ALL or ZOOM E[xtents] should bring them into view). Step 2 - Create a Title Block and/or Border - This needs to be done only if it's not already in the template drawing. Draw them to fit the actual plotted area of the sheet to be used, as outlined earlier. Step 3 - Create a "Sheet Definition" Layer - This may actually be a "family" of layers, depending on whether some items (such as the viewport borders) may need to have special characteristics (color, linetype, visibility) for the final plot. One workable scheme is to give one layer the same name as the Sheet Number (e.g., C1, C2... for Civil Engineering drawings; A1, A2... for architecturals); and then use sublayers (e.g., C1-TEXT) for other classes of objects. In
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  • Fall '12
  • ToddDavidson
  • Scale factor, Scale model, Model Space, paper space

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