Researchers have demonstrated how the cws could be

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Researchers have demonstrated how the CWS could be modified by using different rules, more rules, different stimuli, and the application of group contingencies (Below et al., 2008 ; Blondin et al., 2012 ; Hautau et al., 2008 ; Skinner & Skinner, 2007 ). In the current study, the procedures were modified to include the use of a social story to introduce the intervention to students. Although using social stories to teach CWS procedures was unique, this component was not formal- ly evaluated. Researchers should determine if social stories can help students with ASD and other disabilities learn the rules and routines associated with the CWS. Researchers should consider evaluating other components of the CWS. Previous researchers found that students with ASD often respond well to visual prompts (Ganz & Flores, 2010 ; Pierce et al., 2013 ). Thus, researchers could determine if having the behavioral expectations displayed at all times (i.e., the color displayed on the traffic light indicating behavioral expectations) enhanced students knowledge of behavioral expectations and consequently their rule-following behaviors. Perhaps the visual presence of the color on the traffic light serving as a visual-discriminative stimulus was related to the specific behavioral contingency in place, thus improving dis- criminability and stimulus control. Also, researchers should determine if having the light displayed enhanced teachers ability to consistently support desired behaviors (Fudge et al., 2007 ). As students with ASD often respond well to routine transitions (Cihak, 2011 ), researchers may want to evaluate the consistent application of transition procedures. Students with ASD often have difficulty attending (Chien et al., 2015 ). As the rules for red are designed to enhance attention to directions and instructions for the next activity (e.g., keep your desk cleared, keep your eyes on the speaker), researchers could determine if the temporal warnings and red rules en- hanced students direction following and reduced the need for teachers to repeat directions (Saecker et al., 2008 ). The teachers in the current study indicated other directions for future research. Several teachers queried whether a visual timer, such as a SMART board countdown clock, could be used in addition to a verbal temporal warning. Teachers also indicated that during class time the students appeared to re- spond to the physical presence of the stop light. Researchers Table 4 Tally of teacher agreement for statements measuring teacher acceptability of intervention Statement Yes Maybe No 1. The CW was an acceptable way to increase good student behavior. A, A, A, C B B 2. I would recommend the CW to other teachers. A, A, A, C B B 3. I noticed a positive change in my students behavior. A, A, A, C B, B 4. I would be willing to use the CW again in the future. A, C A, A, B, B 5. The CW is appropriate for a variety of students. A A, A, C B, B 6. I liked the procedures used in the CW. A, A, A, B, C B 7. The CW will produce lasting improvements in the students behavior. A, A, A, C B, B 8. The students enjoyed the CW. A, A, C A B, B 9. The CW will not result in negative side effects for the students performance. A, A, A, B, C B 10. Overall, the CW was beneficial to the students.

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