Major arguments electoral reform 3 the main objective

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Major Arguments
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ELECTORAL REFORM 3 The main objective of any electoral reform is to ensure voters who voted for a candidate who lost the election do not feel left out. In regard to Canadian electoral system, the major argument lies when the winning party garners less than a majority of the popular votes. For instance, a political party may acquire a majority of seats in parliament but fails to get a substantial percentage of popular votes hence the government formed does not have the backing of the citizens. Moreover, a party with more popular votes is not guaranteed to form the government. Various electoral systems can be implemented to replace the existing “first past the post”. These include systems such as proportional representation and ranked ballot which takes into consideration that every vote counts. The proportional representation guarantees the party with the most popular votes gets the majority of the seats in parliament hence forming the government. Germany has implemented the system thus every vote counts in determining who will govern the country. Furthermore, the system allows political parties to form coalitions which increases the chances of winning an election. On the other hand, the ranked ballot is designed in such a way the voters list their preferred candidates by order of preference. The system ensures that the candidate who wins the election must have garnered more than 50 percent of the votes. In the event no candidate gets 50 percent of the total votes cast, a runoff will occur eliminating the last candidate until one who meets the criteria is found. The system is more effective because there are no wasted votes and the elected candidates have the support of the majority. Australia uses the system, and it has proved it reduces tactical voting. Annotated Bibliography Barnes, S. (2016). Electoral reform could be good for your health . Wellesley Institute.
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ELECTORAL REFORM 4 According to the author, electoral systems and health are dependent on each other. The
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