13 As the years go by more of Ashima and Ashokes relatives in India pass away

13 as the years go by more of ashima and ashokes

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13. As the years go by, more of Ashima and Ashoke's relatives in India pass away, and the Gangulis start to fit into American culture a bit more. They even start celebrating Christma. Still, they try to keep up Bengali customs when they can. 14. “... A perpetual wait, a constant burden, a continuous feeling out of sorts.”Lahiri makes a point of describing the feeling of being a foreigner. This is only the first sentence of the paragraph where she uses adjectives and great details to appeal to the reader’s emotion. She makes sure that if you have never experience the feeling of being a foreigner you get a good grasp of it. - “... The neglected dirt lanes, the shaded back roads, the farms where one could pick pumpinks in autumn and buy berries sold in green cardboard boxes in July.” Lahiri describes what Ashima sees when her family goes for drives to explore
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Roseliz Ochoa-Perez Period: 8 12/7/16 their new neighbourhood. She uses detailed description to help the reader picture a peaceful scene of the calm, yet a little depressing neighbourhood. - “She watches The price is Right and Guiding Light and The $10000 Pyramid on television as Ashoke moves in from the living room to her side of the bed.” Lahiri makes a point of mentioning three very American shows to demonstrate how as time passes the Gangulis become more Americanized and merge their cultures. - “The way the principal pronounces his new name is different from the way his parents say it, the second part of it longer, sounding like ‘heel.’” Lahiri describes how the teacher says the name to give the reader a sense of understanding of the mispronunciation. This helps the reader understand why Gogol hates the name even more when someone else says it. 15. Gogol loves the gravestone rubbing lesson because he learns that he is not the only one with an unusual name. He realizes that although there might not be someone with his same name there are people with uncommon names that might have felt as displaced as he is feeling. He creates a strong connection to these names and these people because he identifies with them. Text Dependent Chapter 4: 16. Most of the gifts, which do not interest him, are set aside by his mother to give to cousins back in India. He retreats to his room to listen to the Beatles, an album he received from one of his American friends. Gogol isolates himself with the Beatles, an emblem of his immersion in Western culture, before being interrupted by Ashoke. 17. When he opens it, Gogol finds The Short Stories of Nikolai Gogol , a special copy ordered from a small press in England. Ashoke waits expectantly, but Gogol is unimpressed—he does not know the story of his father’s train accident. He flips through, relieved to find no resemblance between himself and the author’s picture in the front.
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  • Literature, Short story, Nikolai Gogol, gogol, Train wreck, Railway Accidents

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