For their differences such as being ostracized the

This preview shows page 24 - 26 out of 30 pages.

for their differences, such as being ostracized. The social pressure to conform to thesetypicalgender behaviors can significantly impact a person's gender socialization. Explore this ideafurther in "Healthy Sexuality: Are the Genders More Different or More Similar?"SchoolOne function of school is to teach societal standards and institutional expecta-tions, and gender roles are very powerful parts of such expected learning. Most studies showthat, on average, girls do better in school than boys. Girls get higher grades and completehigh school at a higher rate compared to boys (Jacob, 2002). Standardized achievementtests also show that females are better at spelling and perform better on tests of literacy,writing, and general knowledge (National Center for Education Statistics, 2003). Girlscontinue to exhibit higher verbal abilitythroughout high school, but they do not achieveas much as boys after fourth grade on tests of both mathematical and science ability.In late elementary school, females tend to outperform males on several verbal skillstasks including verbal reasoning, fluency, comprehension, and understanding logical rela-tions (Hedges & Nowell, 1995). Males, on the other hand, outperform females on avarietyof spatial skills tasks (Voyer, Voyer, & Bryden, 1995). Males also perform bet-ter on mathematical achievement tests than females. However, gender differences do notapply to all aspects of mathematical skill. Males and females do equally well in basic mathknowledge, and girls have better computational skills. Interestingly, males display greaterconfidence in their math skills, and this type of confidence is a strong predictor of mathperformance (Casey, Nuttall, & Pezaris, 2001).For years, researchers have wondered if these gender differences in abilityin school sub-jects were more a product of biological differences or of social impact. Parents, as a socializ-ing agent, may tip the scale in this nature versus nurture balance. Some parents tend to viewmath as more important for sons and language arts and social studies as more important for
We have textbook solutions for you!
/Developing-Helping-Skills-A-Step-by-Step-Approach-to-Competency-3rd-Edition-9781305943261-1229/
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 05
Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
Chang/Decker/Scott
Expert Verified
Gender and Identity: Process, Roles, and Culturedaughters (Andre, Whigham, Hendrickson, & Chambers, 1999). In fact, parents are likelyto encourage their sons more than their daughters to take advanced high school courses inchemistry, mathematics, and physics (Wigfield, Battle, Keller, & Eccles, 2002).Teacher characteristics and the classroom environment may also contribute to gen-der differences in school. For example, many girls report being passed over in classroomdiscussions, not encouraged by the teacher, and made to feel stupid (Sadker & Sadker,1994). In addition, teachers tend to call on and be more encouraging of boys than girls;they tend to reprimand girls for inappropriate behavior more often than they do boys, andboys tend to receive more praise, attention, and remedial help.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 30 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
AnnetteM.Schonder
Tags
Gender Terminology
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 05
Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
Chang/Decker/Scott
Expert Verified

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture