The quartering act angered the colonists they were

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The Quartering Act angered the colonists. They were suspicious of the troops. They believed that they had been sent to America not to protect colonists but to control them. The colonists also felt that the British should have asked for their approval before passing an act that affected their personal lives and their pocketbooks.
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The Stamp Act The British were in debt after the French and Indian War. They felt that the colonists should help pay for some of the expenses involved in defending the colonies from the French. The Stamp Act, passed in 1765, required the colonists to pay a tax on most printed materials, such as newspapers, pamphlets, marriage licenses, and playing cards. A colonist had to purchase a stamp and place it on any printed document to prove that he or she had paid the tax. The colonists were very angered by the Stamp Act. They weren’t upset just about having to pay the tax. They felt that their freedom had been threatened because they had no say in making the law. The colonists resented being taxed without their consent. Throughout the colonies, people responded in a number of ways: Groups such as the Sons of Liberty and the Daughters of liberty stopped stamped papers from being unloaded at docks. Merchants organized a boycott of British goods. They agreed not to buy anything British. Representatives from nine colonies formed the Stamp Act Congress and declared that the stamp taxes could not be collected without the consent of the colonists. They demanded that Parliament repeal, or do away with, the act. Eventually, Parliament repealed the Stamp Act.
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The Intolerable Acts To “coerce” means to force someone to do something. The British passed the Coercive Acts in reaction to the Boston Tea Party. They hoped to force colonists to pay for the tea lost and to obey British rule.
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