Boston Massachusetts acknowledged the challenge of predicting the future for

Boston massachusetts acknowledged the challenge of

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Boston, Massachusetts, acknowledged the challenge of predicting the future for health care IT. He noted that most business leaders simply don’t know what their technology needs will be five years from now: So how do you get a set of crisp requirements and specifications that are going to be foundational to an IT project? Do you try to get together, bot- tom up, a bunch of people and skate where the puck is going to be? You guess! So in effect, what I have to do across 22,000 employees, 83 [network] locations, 4,000 doctors and two million patients is try to take a best guess at what the future will be. So that’s sort of strategy issue number one. In other words, companies that want to capitalize on digital trends should not start by researching or acquiring technology. You might not even start with a rigorous analysis of today’s business problems. Instead, start by envisioning the impact digital technologies are going to have on your industry, par- ticularly your customer experience over the next decade or more. A long-term vision of where your business needs to go that considers the organiza- tional impact on your people, processes and technology can allow you to reverse-engineer the future and help identify the practical steps and pri- orities for today. The goal of this approach is to avoid capitalizing on the state of current technology for short-term advantage, only to realize later that it moved you faster in the wrong direction. Culture and Transformation Our research also suggests that organizational culture is critically important to effectively leveraging digital technologies in the workplace. One of the factors re- spondents said is most important to effectively leverage digital technologies is the “willingness to experiment and take risks.” They also reported that this trait is among the most lacking in their organizations — something reported by 52% of respondents from early-stage companies and even by 36% in the matur- ing group. (See “The Key Abilities Companies Lack.”) B. Bonin Bough, senior vice president, chief media and e-commerce officer for Mondele ¯z Inter- national Inc., the global snack food spinoff of Kraft Foods Inc., spoke of technology companies’ ability to tackle this challenge: They’ve been able to unlock something that’s a to- tally new mindset and approach. Part of it is this notion of iteration, this notion of constantly rein- venting the core, constantly cannibalizing what you did before, and the fear that their space moves so fast that you can’t sit and wait. We [non-tech companies] have to begin to bring that attitude into our businesses. And so we have to, in a lot of respects, shift culture [and] cultural mindset. The relationship between organizational cul- ture and digital technologies requires a certain mindset, and it may require a shift in your existing mindset before you can leverage digital technolo- gies effectively. For example, Mohamed-Hédi Charki, an associate professor at EDHEC Business School in France, is a researcher studying the impact of a digital collaboration platform in a European cosmetics company. He noted that
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  • Fall '14
  • Goulding,Richard
  • Management, The Land, Deloitte, MIT Sloan School of Management, Juan Pablo Michelsen

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