Discussion and pleading on both our parts i finally

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discussion and pleading on both our parts, I finally had to assert my authority as the director and insist that the designer go with my suggestion, which he did. We did the entire run in Lubbock with this suggestion; however, I was later told by the stage manager that on the first night of the production in Angel Fire, New Mexico, he changed the lighting cue, and it almost caused some of the less experienced actors to break character on stage because they did not know what was going on. Needless to say, when I heard about this, I was hoping never to have to work whh this designer again. After Angel Fire was over he apologized, but I was still a bit dubious of his artistic integrity. I was later informed that he had been moved to lighting designer and replaced with a different scene designer who had less design experience. I now had a new concern, which was "Can she design?" I knew that theoretically she could design because she had taken the scene design course, but I was worried about her level of insight into the script and her ability to find symbols in the script that I had not thought of I voiced my
concern to a professor who asked me, "How else will she get the experience that you would like her to have if she doesn't start somewhere?" After thinking about this for a few days, I agreed and thought that I would make the most out of the situation. I think that I got caught up in trying to do the best show, because this is probably the only show that most of my peers will ever see me direct. Yet after thinking about it, I realized that my goal as a future educator is not to impress but to learn, educate, and do the best with what I am given. Also, as one of my directing professors once told me, "There is not any situation that is perfect or ideal. You must do your best with what you have." In my early discussions with the new scene designer, we discussed the time period in which the play would be set, and I spoke with her about various areas that were needed while making sure that the play had a strong sense of theatricality. I asked her to present me with three different renderings or drawings of a possible set for The Amen Comer. She was a bit confiised as to what I wanted, so I explained it to her in this manner: One design could be a traditional and very realistic set for the space; a second design could be abstract and consist of angles, while a third could be whatever her imagination could conjure up. Apparently the designer viewed these options as homework, because typically 1 was always seeking her out and checking up on the status of the design sketches or ideas. Due to her schedule and a hefty dose of procrastination, I never received those three ideas. It seemed to me that she lacked the ability to think abstractly in relation to scenic design. After a while, the deadline for pre-blocking the show was upon us, and I had only seen one design (the traditional one). 1 was getting nervous.
I therefore accepted the only concept that she had presented to me. I was trying to

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