an impairment loss in respect of held to maturity investments and loans and

An impairment loss in respect of held to maturity

This preview shows page 72 - 73 out of 134 pages.

an impairment loss in respect of held-to-maturity investments and loans and receivables financial assets is recognised in profit or loss and is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate. an impairment loss in respect of available-for-sale financial assets is recognised in profit or loss and is measured as the difference between its cost (net of any principal payment and amortisation) and its current fair value, less any impairment loss previously recognised in the fair value reserve. In addition, the cumulative loss recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity under fair value reserve, is reclassified from equity into profit or loss. If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously recognised impairment loss is reversed through profit or loss to the extent that the carrying amount of the financial asset at the date the impairment is reversed does not exceed what the amortised cost would have been had the impairment not been recognised. In respect of available-for-sale equity instruments, impairment losses previously recognised in profit or loss are not reversed through profit or loss. any increase in fair value subsequent to an impairment loss made is recognised in other comprehensive income. (b) Impairment of Non-financial Assets The carrying values of assets, other than those to which MFRS 136 - Impairment of assets does not apply, are reviewed at the end of each reporting period for impairment when an annual impairment assessment is compulsory or there is an indication that the assets might be impaired. Impairment is measured by comparing the carrying values of the assets with their recoverable amounts. When the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount, the asset is written down to its recoverable amount and an impairment loss shall be recognised. The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of the asset’s fair value less costs to sell and its value-in-use, which is measured by reference to discounted future cash flows using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of an individual asset, the Group determines the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. an impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss immediately unless the asset is carried at its revalued amount. any impairment loss of a revalued asset is treated as a revaluation decrease to the extent of a previously recognised revaluation surplus for the same asset. any impairment loss recognised in respect of a cash-generating unit is allocated first to reduce the carrying amount of
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