1 warm up your audience first comedians warm up their

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1. Warm up your audience first Comedians warm-up their audiences – or if they’re stars – they have another comedian do it for them. You also need to warm up your audience first. They need to get to know you and trust you a little before they’ll venture answering a question. 2. Don’t let them settle into a passive mode But don’t leave it too long before you start asking questions. If you leave it too long, people will settle into a passive “TV- watching” mode and it will be difficult to rouse them into responding. So once you’ve established rapport (2-5 minutes) start asking questions. The audience will then get that this is an interactive presentation and will stay on their toes rather than settling into that passive mode. 3. Move from easy to more challenging questions through your presentation Plan your questions so that they move your presentation forward. This matrix will help you plan your questions. 4. Signal your question Sometimes people don’t answer a question because they weren’t listening or they didn’t realize you wanted an answer. Let your audience know you’re about to ask a question. For example, you might say “Here’s a question I’d like you to answer.” Avoid mixing rhetorical questions (these are questions you don’t expect your audience to answer) with “real” questions. Your audience will get confused about whether they’re supposed to answer or not. 5. Frame your question so that people know exactly what you want A major reason people don’t answer questions in a presentation is because they’re not clear on what the questioner really wants. Never underestimate the ability of the audience to misunderstand your question. The build-up to and the phrasing of your question are both critical to ensuring that people understand the question and are comfortable answering. For example, in my presentation on nervousness, if I simply ask “what symptoms of nervousness do you get?” I might not get many responses and some might be slightly off-topic (eg: I don’t like talking to people I know”). Here’s how I get the best results. I start by telling my own story of getting ultra-nervous before a presentation. I describe my heart-beating as if it was going to explode out of my chest and the sweat trickling down my sides! Then I ask: “What bodily symptoms of nervousness do you get?” The answers come so quick and fast that I have to get someone to help me write them all up on the flipchart. Why does this work so well: 1. I’ve shown them what I want by describing my own physical symptoms. 2. I’ve made them more comfortable about sharing these personal details by sharing first. 3. I’ve made my question ultra-clear by asking for “bodily symptoms”.
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  • Summer '18
  • dalal
  • Speed reading, Scholar Base

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