Shared electron pair bonds can be represented by single double or triple lines

Shared electron pair bonds can be represented by

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Shared-electron-pair bonds can be represented by single, double, or triple lines, depending on how many pairs of electrons are shared. Quadruple bonds are sometimes encountered in the chemistry of transition metals, such as the anion [Re 2 Cl 8 ] 2- which contains the quadruple bond between two rhenium atoms, but it is not very common. In 1916, in his paper “The Atom and the Molecule,” Gilbert Lewis formulated several rules of thumb for chemical bonding. This was ten years before quantum mechanics led to the modern view of molecular electronic structure. Rules such as these allow the bonding pattern in simple molecules to be predicted based on a few basic principles related to the distribution of valence electrons. These principles are guided by the total number of valence electrons available, and an octet (or duet for H) rule determining the total number of electrons which can be associated with a given atom. Lewis Structures and 3D Shapes
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Discussion From creating these Lewis Structures, it really helped me to better be able to visualize the bonding of different molecular ions. Before this lab, some of the bonding and how electron pairs bond to create new molecules, were a little bit confusing. Now, however, I have learned the science behind the bonding of electrons which I talked about in depth in the introduction. I worked well with my partner, Claire, and we were able to work through each problem to come to an answer. It was really helpful being able to work with a partner and get their thoughts and think through the problems together. It always helps to have the insight of someone else. I also found it interesting that there can be lone pairs of electrons not actually bonded. Those are lone pairs outside of the electron shell, and occur in certain situations and certain molecular bonds. It was also interesting seeing how the charge affected these Lewis Structures, electron amount, and overall shape. References [1] McQuarrie, D. A., P. A. Rock, and E. B. Gallogly. General Chemistry. Fourth, Univ  Science Books, 2011, p. 76,77,78,79. Atomic Spectra. 
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