Expand their ideas based on what they have learned in

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expand their ideas based on what they have learned in the readings and rethink andclarify their thinking before writing the unit assignment.Analyze good examplesStudents learn to analyze different types of writing. For instance, they are provided witha list of features of a good summary, then they have to analyze and compare samplesummaries and decide which samples best exemplify the features of a good summary.3Q TIPSQ: Skills for Success Second Edition: Model different kinds of textsStudents are shown the specific features of the text type required in the unit writingassignment (e.g. compare and contrast). Have students read and critique the model.Through the models, students develop awareness of the discourse features inherent inthe kinds of writing required in each unit writing assignment.2Encourage strategic learningQencourages students to be strategic learners in alldomains. Writing tips, for instance, guide studentstoward understanding the notion of unity in writing.Students learn that their thesis statements mustbe supported by details; doing so will create morecoherence in their writing.5Teach grammar in contextThe grammar component tightly integrates the structure under focus with the text type ofthe unit. So, for example, students learn how to use the grammatical notions of parallelstructure and ellipsis and then apply these to their unit writing.4
DB-1Using Discussion Boards for Language LearningSigrun Biesenbach-Lucas, Ph.D., Senior InstructorDonette Brantner-Artenie, M.A., Senior InstructorGeorgetown University, Center for Language Education and DevelopmentMany students beginning their academic study today come to campus equipped withstrong technology skills, yet they soon discover that they need to make the transitionfrom experienced users of technology for social purposes to effective users oftechnology for academic purposes. Becoming familiar with and engaging in a variety ofgenres is part of academic study and is critical for both native (NS) and non-nativeEnglish speaking (NNS) students. For NNS students, however,learning to function inthe genres and with the discourse conventions of their discourse communities poses aparticular challenge(Cheng, 2010, p.74). Academic writing is one of the manydiscourse communities in which ESL students need to function and to follow specificconventions. While ESL programs have long prepared students for traditional academicwriting assignments, like essays and research papers, formal online writing is oftenneglected in ESL instruction despite the growing need for such preparation.Reasons for not including formal online writing assignments can range from limitedresources, instructors’ lack of confidence in their own technology skills, andquestionsabout the relevance of this type of writing. A potential consequence of not addressingsuch writing is that NNS students may be less prepared for these types of assignments,

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Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Language education, Second language acquisition

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