Rheumatoid Arthritiss synovial tissue invades and destroys adjacent cartilage

Rheumatoid arthritiss synovial tissue invades and

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Rheumatoid Arthritis’s synovial tissue invades and destroys adjacent cartilage and bone[Hue173]. Compromised circulation along with increased metabolic needs causes hypoxia and metabolic acidosis in the synovial cells. Similarities and Differences Both disorders are inflammatory joint disease that involve synovial joints and are commonly seen in the knees, hip, hands, and the spine. In rheumatoid arthritis it can also be noted in the feet, wrists, elbows, ankles, and shoulders. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder while osteoarthritis is not, OA is known as the most common age-related disorder.
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Factors that impact disorders Genetics and gender play important roles in each inflammatory disorder. In rheumatoid arthritis genetic factors that can be found are that of the MHC class II alleles[Ham142]. According to Hammer (2014) these alleles present antigens to T cells which help in initiating and driving progression of the disease. In both disorders, women seem to have a higher prevalence of seeing an occurrence, although men can develop either disorder. The prevalence of the disease increases with age and is commonly seen after age 50. References Hammer, G. &. (2014). Pathophysiology of disease: An introduction to clinical medicine (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education. Huether, S. &. (2017). Understanding Pathophysiology (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.
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  • Fall '17
  • keisha lovence
  • autoimmune disease

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