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Death however george does not display any variation

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Unformatted text preview: death, however, George does not display any variation of sadness in response to his mother’s passing. He initially had plans to go on a date with Helen White, but they were interrupted by the death of his mother. He was “a little annoyed that his mother died on that day” (Anderson 128). The way that Anderson depicts George’s response indicates how his mother’s death was an inconvenience to him. Furthermore, as he was sitting by his mother’s body, George starts to deny the fact his mother died. He “half lifted the sheet that covered her, but his courage failed” (Anderson 129). Once again, George is faced to feel the strong emotions after his mother’s death but avoids it because he doesn’t have enough strength to face them. He can’t fully accept what happened and still does not react in a proper way. The relationship between George and Elizabeth Willard is one of the most significant relationships throughout Anderson’s novel. It displays the immaturity of both of their characters and how they fail to effectively react to their emotions. Most importantly, however, is how Elizabeth’s inability to grow emotionally affected George in 25 Jung the long run. Her inability to properly become a mature adult caused George to lack in his maturity as he grew up. Fussell and Szczesiul, the two scholars, have opposing takes on George’s growth: Fussell says he has grown, and Szczesiul does not think that he has. Despite the accuracy of Szczesiul’s evaluation, he does not mention the reason to George’s immaturity, which undermines his overall argument. The obvious influence of Elizabeth on her son suggests that the relationship between a mother and her child is very powerful and can have a lasting effect on the child. 26 Word count: 1, 597 Annotated Bibliography Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio: Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Contexts, Criticism. Ed. Charles E. Modlin and Ray Lewis. New York: W. W. Norton. 1996. Print. Fussell, Edwin. “Winesburg, Ohio: Art and Isolation”. Modern Fiction Studies. Ed. Maurice Beebe. Vol. 6 1960. 106-114. Print. In this difficult and intensive reading, Fussell attempts to express his impressions on Winesburg, Ohio, the central setting of Anderson’s novel. He ultimately makes the connection between artistic success and the protagonist’s ability to succeed as a writer. Fussell goes as far as to say that George Willard has matured by the end of the novel, enough to be a successful writer. That’s the key difference that Edwin Fussell points out in his essay: apart from the other key characters in the novel, George has been able to accept the idea of isolation and being alone. This is what helps him mature compared to everyone else. Fussell has worked as a professor and an assistant professor in English at numerous universities....
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