Studies have shown that as a result of the portrayal

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Studies have shown that as a result of the portrayal of women in the music industry children who have more exposure to it are more likely to become womanizers, spousal abusers, and have children by many different partners. There have been numerous studies that have come back with convincing evidence on this topic. Alecia Jones, a graduate student pursuing her PhD on portrayal of women in music videos and video games, recently did a study on the effects that media exposure has on self esteem of college aged female students (Jones 1). The results of her experiment showed that females who have had more exposure to the media relating to music videos and video games had a lower self esteem in terms of appearance, attributes, and weight as compared to the female viewers who have had less exposure to these media forms (Jones 1). After the analysis of this experiment you can conclude that the music industry causes detrimental effects on a human being that can lead to psychological instability as well as ruining a female’s emotional and physical well being. These young ladies are being led to believe that they should allow men to use them for sex and wait on men like servants. This creates a low self-esteem within them. This attributes to women having children at young ages, dropping out of school, and being stuck in low income jobs. You may think that the hip-hop and rap industry is just mere entertainment, but as you can see it generates a ripple effect that changes lives forever and can have other unforeseen effects. This has occurred because the corporate officials are capitalizing financially of off people buying records with females who expose their body. Entertainment is watching a funny movie, a sporting event, playing videogames, reading a pleasurable magazine or book. Entertainment is not about selling sex and showing women half naked as the way to amuse. That is both degrading and against what the originators of this genre of music envisioned how the industry would be later down the road. The original artists wanted
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to be heard and were rapping about lyrics of inequalities that they faced and how to deal with it. These artists were looking for order and justice in society. Today’s artist’s lyrical messages have switched. I feel this is because today we have more rights and are more equal in society than people in former generations. There are many other types of leisure activity that you can partake in that will stimulate a pleasurable effect that doesn’t result in the mistreatment of the female population in the rap and hip-hop music industry. So how can we change this misconstrued perception of equating sexist music videos as entertainment? Who ultimately possesses the power to change this image that has been allowed to flourish in the music industry?
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