MSL101L08 Seven Army Values and Warrior Ethos SR.pdf

Living the warrior ethos putting its spirit into

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Living the Warrior Ethos-putting its spirit into action-requires confidence in yourself, trust in your team, and the courage that comes from deeply held common values. SFC Paul Smith embodied the Warrior
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10 Ethos. Consider how SFC Smith's behavior meant the difference between survival and disaster for his unit. Note that SFC Smith's gallantry, valor, and willingness to give his own life in protecting the lives of others under fire earned him our nation's highest decoration. Never Accept Defeat At the battle for Bastogne, Belgium, during World War II, surrounded American paratroops simply did not recognize the idea of their defeat. It was not an option they accepted. Defeat is not in the vocabulary of the Soldier who lives the Warrior Ethos. A single-minded focus on victory is the path to successful outcomes. The resistance to defeat and the determination to win fuels your Soldiers' and your unit's enthusiasm, willingness, and commitment. On the other hand, a lack of focus on victory can sap your unit's effectiveness and erode cohesion. Never Quit At the Battle of Little Round Top at Gettysburg in 1863, the 20th Maine held its position until it had exhausted its ammunition and reserves. Then, in the face of a determined enemy, it charged. As one military commander put it, everyone's afraid in combat; the hero is the one who holds on a minute longer. Your pledge to succeed in all you do carries with it the obligation, in some circumstances, to lead your Soldiers beyond their limits, to take them where they never believed they could go. Tenacity, audacity, and unbending perseverance are key qualities of those who live the Warrior Ethos. Never Leave a Fallen Comrade In Somalia, Army Rangers begged their commanders for permission to go back into the fight to rescue killed and wounded comrades. Their determination is an example of the heart of the Warrior Ethos. The Army is a team made up of ever-smaller teams. Their cohesion makes the Army work. That cohesion is built on mutual trust, personal and professional loyalty, and a powerful interdependence. Team members look out for each other, support each other, and promise never to abandon each other in a tough spot. Living the Warrior Ethos means taking personal responsibility for the welfare and ultimate fate of your fellow Soldiers. Instilling the Warrior Ethos in Your Soldiers Living the Warrior Ethos is a way of life, a mindset, a daily commitment. By teaching your Soldiers to emulate heroes like the ones you have studied, you instill in them the courage, pride, and dedication to unit, Army, and country that has guided all American military heroes throughout our history. Not everyone finds himself or herself in a desperate battle with everything on the line. Service with distinction is within the power of every American Soldier, however. Your steady guidance and insistence on behavior that expresses the Warrior Ethos will help your Soldiers earn that distinction and lead to better unit cohesion and mission success.
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