Hidden Figures manages to be more than an inspiring history lesson with

Hidden figures manages to be more than an inspiring

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Hidden Figures manages to be more than an inspiring history lesson with wonderful performances. Katherine (played by a radiant Taraji P. Henson) is the film’s ostensible central character, but her story is interwoven with those of Mary (Janelle Monáe) and Dorothy (Octavia Spencer). Mary went on to became NASA’s first black female engineer and Dorothy was a mathematician who became NASA’s first African American manager. Hidden Figures begins in 1961. Katherine, Mary, and Dorothy are part of NASA’s pool of human “computers”, these are employees, usually women, charged with doing calculations before the use of digital computers. Due to Virginia’s segregation laws, African American female computers have to work in a separate “colored” building at the Langley Research Center. Because of her expertise in analytic geometry, Katherine is assigned to a special task group trying to get Glenn into orbit. She arrives at her new job to find she’s the sole brown face in the room.
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HIDDEN FIGURES ANALYSIS 3 Katherine is closest to the excitement, but Hidden Figures goes beyond Katherine and examines all three women’s lives and the struggles they go through being women of color in a white, male-dominated industry. Mary must navigate layers of racist bureaucratic hurdles in her quest to become an engineer. Dorothy is fighting for a long overdue promotion, while the arrival of an IBM machine threatens to put her team of computers out of work. The women consistently
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  • Fall '18
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  • Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan

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