Body The story made a point and had at least two to four main ideas

Body the story made a point and had at least two to

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10–9 9–8 8–7 7–0 Body —The story made a point and had at least two to four main ideas that were developed and organized well. There were clear transitions from one idea to the next. Supporting details were incorporated and used to strengthen the main point of the speech. If outside sources were used, they were cited properly. 15–13 13–12 12–11 10–0 Conclusion —The speaker’s conclusion summa- rized the points in an interesting or creative way. It wrapped up the speech, making it clear to the audience the speech was at its end. 10–9 9–8 8–7 7–0 Format—10 points The student included the required opening line: The audience I am addressing for this speech is _________. The student followed that line with a 5-second pause. 10–8 8–7 7–6 6–0 The speech was 4–5 minutes long. One point will be deducted for every 10 seconds over 5 min- utes and under 4 minutes.
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Speech 38 NOTES
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Rehearsal and Delivery ASSIGNMENT 7: ORGANIZING YOUR SPEECH Read this introduction. Then study Chapter 7, pages 133–171, in your textbook. You can be sure that your most attentive listeners will be try- ing to identify your thesis and main points as you give your speech. If they can’t focus on the points you’re making, they may lose interest or feel there’s no point in listening. The primacy-recency effect describes our natural tendency to remember the first and last things in a series better than the things that come in between. In a speech, the primacy- recency effect means your introduction and conclusion are likely to make the greatest impression on your listeners. Develop Your Main Points Begin organizing your speech by developing the main points that are most important to your thesis. They should be lim- ited in number—two, three, or four work best. Select those points that are most relevant or interesting to your audience and word them effectively. Organize Your Main Points Well-organized speeches are easier to understand. Once you’ve identified the main points you wish to include in your speech, you need to organize them into a clearly identified organizational pattern. There are many ways to do this: n In a topical pattern, your main ideas—equal in impor- tance and value—are itemized. n In a temporal pattern, your main ideas are arranged chronologically. n In a problem-solution pattern, your main ideas are divided into problems and solutions. 39 L e s s o n 2 L e s s o n 2
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n In a spatial pattern, your main ideas are arranged in the space pattern—for example, left to right. n In a cause-and-effect pattern, your main ideas are arranged into causes and effects. n In a motivated sequence pattern, your main ideas are arranged into five steps: attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action. Creating the Introduction The goals of an introduction are to get the audience’s atten- tion, to establish listener relevance, and to identify your thesis statement.
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