Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

In households where there are adults affected by

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In households where there are adults affected by HIV/AIDS, we can expect an increase in the incidence of children having to care for terminally ill people, and having to earn an income because breadwinners are ill or have died. This reduces their ability to further their education. It may also expose them to serious risks, such as where they are forced by circumstance to work on the streets or sell sexual favours. To aggravate matters, the existing formula for allocating equitable share funds to provinces is based partly on the number of children within the age range in which children are expected to complete compulsory education. Many children may start school late or interrupt their schooling because of HIV/AIDS. This means the state will not pay a full contribution towards their first nine years of education. Schools require that children falling outside the age of compulsory education pay full fees, because the prohibition against excluding children from school due to non-payment of fees applies only to those still subject to compulsory education. HIV/AIDS, and children infected and affected by the pandemic, were raised as priority issues at six of the provincial consultative workshops. The government's programme is to encourage orphaned, abandoned or impoverished children affected by HIV/AIDS to remain in their homes and communities, with the understanding that they will receive appropriate care and assistance, including education. The National DE has embarked on the training of teachers and life skills coordinators to address the issue at a curriculum level. Audits of orphans and counselling are other important projects that the DE is embarking on. There is a widespread awareness campaign related to this issue at both provincial and national level. The national DSD has developed detailed National Guidelines for Social Services to Children Infected and Affected by HIV/AIDS. Unfortunately, the document contains little, if anything, on child labour or child work. Proposals are as follows: (117) Research should be done to determine the extent of child-headed households and AIDS orphans, and the effect that HIV/AIDS is likely to have on child labour , and to make recommendations regarding appropriate action. Lead institution: DSD ; Secondary institutions: DL, DH*. New policy? Regarding child labour and child-headed households – elaboration of existing policy. Once-off cost: moderate. ILO funding: full research costs. Time line : to start within two years of adoption of policy. (118) The growing number of home-based care programmes could play a role in terms of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Fieldworkers for all home-based care programmes need to be trained to recognise the problems children face in HIV/AIDS-affected households, and link them up with the necessary assistance services. Government must find ways to work together with and support – financially and otherwise – the full range of home-based programmes. Lead institution: DrSD* ; Secondary institutions: DPLG, LG, DH, NGOs. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy.
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