Examples complete the following unit equations and

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Examples : Complete the following unit equations and write two unit factors for each. (A.6.1) 1 cm = ? m (A.6.2) 1 Mg = ? g (A.6.3) 1 mL = ? dL (A.6.4) 1 μ s = ? s III.) Exponents and Scientific Notation B.) Review of exponents and powers of 10 e.g. 5 x 5 x 5 = 125 = 5 3 where 5 is the base number and 3 is the exponent. e.g. 10 x 10 = 100 = 10 2 or 1 x 10 2 . e.g. Example : Express the following numbers as powers of 10: 100, 0.0001 C.) Scientific Notation General Format: D.DD… x 10 n where (1) D.DD… is called the coefficient (always a number between 1&10). (2) 10 n is called the exponent . Note : The coefficient always holds the significant figures in the measurement 2
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expressed in scientific notation. Why use scientific notation? It is convenient to express very large or very small values in this notation because it is more compact than floating decimal notation . Sometimes the only way to express a given value to the correct number of S.F.’s is to use this notation. Examples : (1) Converting from floating decimal to scientific notation. (a) 100. = ? (b) 0.000010 = ? (c) 10,000 = ? (2) Converting from scientific to floating decimal notation. (d) 5.55 x 10 3 = ? (e) 3.030 x 10 -4 = ? * * If you don’t know how to express value in scientific notation using your calculator , please see me for help! Chapter3: Matter and Energy I.) Matter: Anything that occupies volume and has mass. A.) States of Matter (Phases) 1.) Three States: Solid, Liquid, Gas (see Figure 3.4 in text) 2.) States can be distinguished by their in terms of their shape, occupied volume, and compressibility . (see Table 3.1 in text) 3.) Can convert a substance in a particular physical state to any other physical state through physical change . (See Figure 3.9 in text) B.) Classification of Matter (See Figure 3.8 in text). 1.) Mixtures: contain two or more substances. a.) Heterogeneous: mixtures that have physically distinguishable parts; not uniform throughout (e.g. chalk and water) b.) Homogeneous: mixtures that have physically indistinguishable parts; Chem. 110 Fall 2008 Citrus Community College Lesson III: Metric System, Matter & Energy (Chs. 2& 3) 3
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uniform throughout (e.g. filtered sea water).
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