FSS
Making Jam, jellies and the fruit preserves.pdf

In products made with no added pectin limit corn

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In products made with no added pectin, limit corn syrup to replace up to one-fourth of the sugar. For instance, if a recipe calls for 4 cups of sugar, you may use up to 1 cup corn syrup plus 3 cups of sugar. M A K I N G J A M S , J E L L I E S & F R U I T P R E S E R V E S 7
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Sugar substitutes Sugar substitutes — also called artifi- cial sweeteners — will not produce a quality jellied product.They cannot replace sugar in regular recipes because sugar is needed to form a gel. For no- or low-sugar products, use a low-sugar or “no sugar added” pectin that requires little or no added sugar, such as low-methoxyl pectin. Follow the manufacturer’s directions exactly for quality jellied products. If you use modified or low- methoxyl pectin: In cooked jams or jellies, you can use a saccharin sweetener — brand names Sweet ‘N Low®, Sugar Twin®, Sweet 10®.* But this may leave a slightly bitter aftertaste. In cooked jams or jellies, you may also use Sucralose®, also labeled Splenda®.* Sucralose® is the only noncaloric sweetener made from sugar.This stable sweetener will not produce an aftertaste on heating. In recipes that require heating, do not use aspartame — brand names Equal® or NutraSweet®. Aspartame loses its sweetness when heated. 8 Wisconsin Safe Food Preservation Series Sugar Sugar is another essential ingredient in jellied fruit products. A common cause of failure in making any jellied fruit product is using less sugar than the recipe calls for. Sugar must be present in proper pro- portion with pectin and acid to make a good gel. Sugar preserves the fruit product, prevents growth of microbes, and contributes to flavor. White sugar, corn syrup and honey can be used to sweeten jellied fruit products. Sugar substitutes are not recommended for quality jellied fruit products. * Reference to products is not intended to endorse them, nor to exclude others that may be similar. Examples are listed as a convenience to readers. If you use these products, follow the manufacturer’s current label directions.
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Equipment and containers Get all the necessary equipment, utensils and containers ready before you start to make jams and jellies. Check the list below to make sure you have everything you will need on hand. For preparing fruit Bowl, large — for holding juice Colander — for washing fruit Jelly bag, square yard of unbleached muslin or cotton flannel with the napped side turned in, or four layers of closely woven cheese- cloth — Jelly bags or cloths should be damp when extracting juice. Knife, paring — for peeling or cutting fruit Potato masher, sieve, blender or food mill (grinder) — for crushing fruit, removing seeds and extracting juice Rubber or plastic gloves — for pro- tecting hands when preparing hot peppers Saucepan with cover, large — for preparing fruit or juice For measuring Bowls — for holding measured sugar and pectin-sugar mixture when powdered pectin is added Measuring cups , standard dry and liquid — for measuring prepared fruit, juice or sugar Measuring spoons — for measuring
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  • Fall '13
  • DavidWiley

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