concentrations of Chippewa in the reservation one was Moconces village fronting

Concentrations of chippewa in the reservation one was

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concentrations of Chippewa in the reservation; one was Moconce's village, fronting Anchor Bay, and the other was a small reserve at Swan Creek (Fair Haven). According to the GAZETTEER OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN, published in 1838, there were 180 Chippewa living on the Swan Creek Reserve, under the leader of Chief Francois Maconce. They were hunters and trappers who sold the pelts; they also fished and made maple sugar. The whole reservation comprised 5,760 acres.In 1836 a treaty with the Swan Creek (and the Black River bands near Port Huron), surrendered the reservation in Ira Township to the government in return for lands in Omaha (Kansas) Territory. The treaty was signed by the local chiefs only and not put to the tribesmen for a vote. In 1838 it was surveyed, divided into sections, and later placed on sale. The plots were available for purchase from May 15, 1830, until October 30, 1848. Some of the purchasers were James H. Cook, Henry Connor, Medar St. James de Beauvis, Charles Paquette, Luther Stoddard, Lansing Mizner, Antoine Eabire, Peter Rose, Ira Davenport, John Dalloz, Stephen Rose, Timothy Boyer, Stephen Chortier, Antoine Laponse, Augustus Fauche, Louis Beaufait, Ed R. Kearsley, Jonathan Kearsley, Ed N. Kearsley, Constant Lorselle, Henry R. Mizner, Abram Destrut, Joseph Miller, Felix Vigneron, Toussaint Chortier, Antoine Legar, James Landry, and Francis Palms. (Francis Palms is reported to have purchased a total of 2,183 acres during the years the land was available; according to legend, he acquired the land from the Potawatomi Chief Lerner upon marriage to the chief’s daughter.)There had been much agitation from the settlers to remove the Indians from this land for a number of reasons. The Indians had sided with the enemy in two wars; their land was valuable waterfront property;there were always fears of Indian raids. According to Mrs. Agnes Gill, the farms were often set up as
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