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5 materialism and self concept prove how insecurity

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5. Materialism and self-concept prove how insecurity motivates people to work so hardfor material possessions as the same wealth becomes their source of security.6. Materialism and lack of engagement mean losing one’s ability to empathize withothers as they become callous to other people’s needs.
ACCORDING TO GREGOIRE (2017) MATERIALISM MAKES PEOPLE UNHAPPYFOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS:1. Consumer culture may be harming individual well-being.Allegedly those who pursue more wealth and greater material possessions are lesssatisfied as they experience less positive emotions.2. Materialistic values are linked to Type-A behaviour.Those who are highly ambitious are highly competitive and materialistic. These aretraits of a Type-A personality.3. Money really cannot buy you happiness.Several studies have shown that wealthy people are highly susceptible to depression.Researches have also shown that money is not exactly what brings about thedissatisfaction and the unhappiness but the extreme desire to earn more.4. Materialism could ruin your relationship.Materialistic values result to low-quality relationships and disconnectedness.5. Consumer cultures may breed narcissistic personalities.Narcissist are highly arrogant as they are deeply concerned with inadequacy. They worka lot for power and prestige to cover up their perceived emptiness and low self-worth.All these sentiments demand validation form others through praises, compliments andapproval.6.Consumerism is fuelled by insecurity.Research shows that those who are extremely doubtful of their self-worth arehighly insecure and thus have the tendency to be more materialistic.Consumerism capitalizes on insecurity so their products and services will selland be highly demanded.
Material SelfThe Art of Buying: Types of ConsumersTHE ART OF BUYING: COMING TO TERMS WITH MONEY AND MATERIALISMTatzel, M (2003), The Art of Buying: Coming to Terms with Money and Materialism,Journal of Happiness Studies 420-429ABSTRACT. Money and possessions hold strong attractions, but being driven toacquire them in order to enhance one’s social standing is associated with lowered well-being. Literatures on money and happiness, materialism, and cultural mediators arereviewed. Consumer well-being is associated with being neither very tight nor veryloose with money, with having relatively low financial aspirations, and with being low inmaterialism. Price-related behaviors – whether to spend low, spend high, or attempt tomaximize value – are ways of responding to economic outlay vis-a-vis material wants,and these “strategies” offer a window into broader consumer lifestyles: the ValueSeeker type is tight with money and materialistic; the Big Spender is loose with moneyand materialistic; the Non-Spender is tight with money and not materialistic; and theExperiencer is loose with money and not materialistic. Each of these types is describedin terms of the potentials for well-being as well as the risks. Intrinsic motivation emergesas a key to well-being.

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