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Click the button to learn more.Lesson 2, Page 20:CounterinsurgencyDescription:Counterinsurgency (COIN) operations include support provided to a government in the military,paramilitary, political, economic, psychological, and civic actions it undertakes to defeat insurgency.COIN operations often include:Security assistance programs such as foreign military salesForeign military financingInternational military education and trainingForeign internal defense (FID)Security force assistance (SFA)For further guidance on support to COIN, refer to JP 3-24, Counterinsurgency Operations.Narration:Counterinsurgency (COIN) operations include support provided to a government in the military,paramilitary, political, economic, psychological, and civic actions it undertakes to defeat insurgency.Insurgents will increasingly resort to irregular forms of warfare as effective ways to undermine theiradversaries’ legitimacy and credibility and to isolate their adversaries from the relevant populations andtheir external supporters; physically as well as psychologically. At the same time, they also seek to bolstertheir own legitimacy and credibility to exercise authority over that same population.COIN operations often include security assistance programs such as foreign military sales, foreign militaryfinancing, and international military educations and training. Such support also may include FID andsecurity force assistance (SFA). In some cases, U.S. COIN operations can be much more extensive andinvolve joint force limited contingency or major operations.
For further guidance on support to COIN, refer to JP 3-24, Counterinsurgency Operations.Lesson 2, Page 21:Unique ConsiderationsDescription:”Instead of thinking about warfighting agencies like command and control, you create a politicalcommittee, a civil military operations center to interface with volunteer organizations. These becomethe heart of your operations, as opposed to a combat or fire-support operations center.”- Lt. Gen A. C. Zinni, USMC, CG, I MEF, 1994-1996Click each button to learn more.Interagency, IGO, NGO, and HN Coordination (Button 1)There is an increased need for the military to work with other U.S. government departments andagencies, IGOs, NGOs, and HN authorities to plan and conduct military engagement, securitycooperation, and deterrence operations and activities. Liaison organizations such as a Joint InteragencyCoordination Group (JIACG) can help promote interaction and cooperation among diverse agencies.Consensus building is a primary task and can be aided by understanding each agency’s capabilities andlimitations as well as any constraints that may preclude the use of a capability. The goal – to developand promote the unity of effort needed to accomplish a specific mission – can be achieved byestablishing an atmosphere of trust and cooperation.

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
The Art of War, On War, joint operations, military operations

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