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The opening of sl valves allows ventricles to eject

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The opening of SL valves allows ventricles to eject their blood (and O2, etc.) intothe systemic and pulmonary circuits.Notice aortic pressure increases during phase 3 almost as much as ventricularpressure does. Why? You are adding more blood to it. Aortic pressure is not justsitting there. It is a long tube filled with blood. During this phase, you arepushing more blood into it. Ventricular pressure is going up because ventricles
are contracting. Aortic pressure is going up because it is receiving more blood(not contracting).oIsovolumetric Relaxation-DiastoleThis phase is diastole because the ventricles are relaxed.Arterial Pressure < Ventricular Pressure < Aortic PressureAll valves are closed.AV is closed because pressure in the ventricles is higher than pressure in theatria.SL is closed because pressure in the aorta is still higher than pressure in theventricles. Why is pressure higher in the ventricles than the atria? The ventriclesare in the process of relaxing, but they are not there yet. The atria are in theprocess of filling up with blood.Ventricular pressure is only higher than atrial pressure for the SHORT period oftime. The whole point of the isovolumetric phases is so you understand thatnothing happens immediately: it takes time to build and relieve pressure.***Atrial pressure > Ventricular pressure = open AV valves***Atrial pressure < Ventricular pressure = closed AV valves***Ventricular pressure > aortic pressure = open SL valves***Ventricular pressure < aortic pressure = closed SL valves
Chapter 13: Respiratory PhysiologyInternal vs. External RespirationOne of the main purposes of the circulatory system is to pump blood into the lungs and addoxygen and remove CO2Internal Respiration: cellular respirationoUse of O2 and production of CO2. Location: mitochondriaExternal RespirationoExchange of O2 and CO2 between atmosphere and body tissuesoBased on diffusion, which is based on pressure/concentration differences (gradient)moving down the path of high pressure to low pressure. The benefit of diffusion is that itexpends no energy, so we can get oxygen into our lungs and CO2 out of our bodieswithout having to use ATP directly to transport.oIt is all based on how much there is and how much pressure is being applied.oA four step process that involves pulmonary ventilation (the method human beings useto breathe)1. Pulmonary ventilation: breathing2. Gas exchange between lungs and blood via diffusion3. Transport of O2 and CO2 in blood to tissues4. Gas exchange between blood and tissues via diffusionRespiratory AnatomyPathway of air:oEnters through nasal and oral cavityoPharynxTube for air and foodoLarynxoTracheaoEach lung
oPrimary bronchioSecond bronchioTertiary bronchioBronchiolesoAlveoliTiny sacs at the end of bronchioles with very thin walls that are covered bycapillaries which also have very thin walls. The purpose of the capillaries is tohave more surface areaThis is where the adding of oxygen and the removal of CO2physically occursoUpper airways are air passages in the head and necko

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Term
Spring
Professor
KT
Tags
Physiology, right ventricle

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