Almost bluntly that marlowe is going to try to find

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almost bluntly that Marlowe is going to try to find out what else there is to Geiger's rare bookstore. In the movie, the audience is only allowed to follow to hero, after he has put two and two together. With the story line of Geiger's bookstore, the movie cuts to Marlowe in the library looking up rare books, which is confusing to the viewer who hasn't read the book. The audience has to hope that Marlowe knows what he is doing. In the novel, the reader is allowed to be a part of the thinking process, the reader isn't just dragged along to where the protagonist wants to go. The reader knows where Marlowe is going to go, and knows what triggered him to go to that place, so the faith in the hero is more in the written version of this story, than the visual version. The narrator is missed in the big screen version of The Big Sleep. The plot of the movie is much more difficult to understand without the narrator. Somehow, even with the production code intact, I think that if a narrator had been used, the movie would have
been even better than it was. The movie does not even incorporate the idea of "the big sleep." At the end of the novel, Marlowe has another internalized soliloquy where he contemplates the meaning of life. "What did it matter where you lay once you were dead? In a dirty sump or in a marble tower on top of a high hill? You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep, you were not bothered by things like that" (Chandler, 230). The title of the movie makes no sense without that little bit in it about death. Sure, the writers had a very hard task in front of them. Not many people I know can easily write as Chandler did, and the writers had to adapt it to a film version! I think that for the time the movie was produced, 1946, that it was tremendous still without the narrator. Chandler had many things in his novel that could not be discussed on film (i.e. homosexuality, pornography, etc). The writers did well, but the narrator is missed most definitely. Works Cited "Big Sleep, The." The Internet Movie Database Ltd. Online. Internet. 10 Apr. 1999. "Big Sleep, The." Greatest Films. (1996). Online. Internet. 10 Apr. 1999. Chandler, Raymond. The Big Sleep. New York: Vintage Books, 1996.

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