Makeup water strm0903 100528 221665 00001 3051 241658

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Makeup Water STRM0903 100,528 221,665 0.0001 $30.51 $241,658 $0.010 BFW Chemicals STRM0921 0 1 1.5801 $0.95 $7,496 $0.000 CW Chemicals STRM0922 4 9 1.0000 $8.67 $68,694 $0.003 WWT Nutrients STRM0630 55 122 0.1100 $13.43 $106,405 $0.004 WWT Chemicals STRM0631 0.18 0.40 2.5000 $0.99 $7,835 $0.000 Denaturant (Gasoline) 390.12 860.21 0.0924 $79.51 $629,739 $0.025 Subtotal $2,147.50 $17,008,236 $0.680 Waste Streams Solids Disposal STRM804C 2,514 5,543 0.01 $54.55 $432,025 $0.017 Solids Disposal STRM0229 1,385 3,055 0.01 $30.06 $238,102 $0.010 Subtotal $84.61 $670,126 $0.027 By-Product Credits KW $/KWh Electricity Generated WKBLRNET (17,976) na 0.040 -$719.04 -$5,694,808 -$0.228 Electricity Consumption 9,229 na 0.040 $369.15 $2,923,671 $0.117 Electricity Required/(Excess) (8,747) -$349.89 -$2,771,137 -$0.111 Total Variable Operating Costs $1,882.23 $14,907,225 $0.596 Labor, Supplies & Overheads Hourly Wage Operators per Shift Multiplier Basis for Multiplier $/hour (1999) $/yr (1999) $/Gallon Fuel Ethanol (1999) Direct Labor Operators $18 10 $180 $1,425,600 $0.057 Maintenance $18 4 $72 $570,240 $0.023 Administration Salaries 40% of Operators & Maintenance Labor $798,336 $0.032 Operating Supplies 0.75% of Capital Cost (per year) $1,020,000 $0.041 Maintenance Supplies 1% of Capital Cost (per year) $1,360,000 $0.054 upkeep) 60% of Total Labor $1,676,506 $0.067 Insurance & Property Taxes 1.5% of Capital Cost (per year) $2,040,000 $0.082 Total Labor, Supplies & Overheads $8,890,682 $0.356 Depreciation (Straight Line) 10 Years Economic Life $13,600,000 $0.544 Total Annual Operating Cost $37,397,907 $1.496 Cost of Stover $12,122,751 $0.485 Process Operating Net Cost Less electricity credit $25,275,156 $1.011 Operating Costs 25MM Annual Gallons Fuel Ethanol from Corn Stover
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REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB NO. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE October 2000 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Technical Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining the Cost of Producing Ethanol from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew McAloon, Frank Taylor, Winnie Yee, Kelley Ibsen, Robert Wooley 5. FUNDING NUMBERS T: BFP1.7110 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Department of Agriculture Eastern Regional Research Center Agricultural Research Service Wyndmoor, PA 19038 and National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER NREL/TP-580-28893 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES A Joint Study Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Energy 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The mature corn-to-ethanol industry has many similarities to the emerging lignocellulose-to-ethanol industry. It is certainly possible that some of the early practitioners of this new technology will be the current corn ethanol producers. In order
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