Or as leanne payne and kevin perotta wrote several

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Or, as Leanne Payne and Kevin Perotta wrote several years ago for "Pastoral Renewal" magazine, Christian Jungianism is so confusing because "by giving natural psychological drives and images a divine authority and infallibility, it deflects the word of God which comes to 'discern the thoughts and intentions of the heart' (Hebrews 4:12). The notion that fallen man is equipped with a natural drive and center already containing God's purpose and wisdom implies a duty to obey the self, creating a crisis of loyalties when, as inevitably happens, the self's inclinations run counter to the summons to take up the cross and follow Christ .... Jungians treat supernatural and spiritual realities as psychological realities. Creeds and confessions are regarded as projections of the psyche. Christianity is then valued not for the truths it reveals about man and God, but for its usefulness in mapping and exploring the unconscious. Consequently, Scripture is interpreted subjectively. Christ loses His uniqueness as incarnate Word and mediator between God and man… Jungianism, by pushing God beyond the range of human knowledge and beyond good and evil, establishes a god who is both good and evil, a mere projection of the human mind, under whose image spiritual forces come to domineer over human lives. The repudiation of Yahweh invites the return of Baal. The abandonment of the search for holiness and transformation in the Spirit leaves the way open for spirits of sexual bondage, phallic demons ." In invoking the aid of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Church's battle against the new Albigensianism under the title of "Restorer of the Christian Order," Pope Leo XIII noted the power of the rosary to counter the spread of heresy. It's of more than passing interest, as several observers have remarked, that once Catholics enter the Jung Cult, they quickly learn to despise the rosary as an out-of-date, ineffective symbol of the old Church. This article was taken from the January 5, 1995 issue of "The Wanderer," 201 Ohio Street, St. Paul, MN 55107. Jungians believe Traditional Catholics impede “renewal” EXTRACT By Paul Likoudis Like the Albigensian heresy which it so closely resembles, the Jung Cult in the Catholic Church developed during a time of social crisis . In both 12th-century France and 20th-century America, society was characterized by both pleasure-seeking and an increase in crime. Catholics, in both centuries, were
increasingly unsure of what orthodox belief demanded of them. From roughly A.D. 1000 to 1200, Albigensian bishops and priests predominated in France and Switzerland, and the heresy grew within the Church until it had become the norm. The Albigensians, it must be said, believed that they were practicing a purer faith, and had returned to ancient and apostolic traditions. They rejected transubstantiation and belief in the Real Presence, but their worship services consisted of mimicking the Last Supper.

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