9 But if you clarify a problem and understand measurement you can measure

9 but if you clarify a problem and understand

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Following these four guidelines will make sure that your results will have merit.9.But, if you clarify a problem and understand measurement, you can measure intangibles, also called “soft” issues.Description
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oTo get an idea of the potential market share of a new product in your area, use other cities as a “heterogeneous benchmark.” Compare disparate factors to help prioritize seemingly incomparable aspects and to gauge qualitative impacts, like how much a technology snafu would affect your brand versus how much harm a hacking incident would generate.ApplicationoMake sure you know your marketplace and which are “soft issues” and which are not.10.Measurement tools include sampling and using the right benchmarks.DescriptionoAlthough it may seem cumbersome at first, Bayes’ theorem is one of the most powerful measurement tools at our disposal. It is the way it reframes the measurement question that makes it so useful. Given a particular observation, it may seem more obvious to frame a measurement by asking the question “What can I conclude from this observation?” or, in probabilistic terms, “What is the probability X is true, given my observation?” But Bayes showed us that we could, instead, start with the question, “What is the probability of this observation if X were true?” (190)ApplicationoYou need to be able to measure your results correctly or your research will be pointless.
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  • Spring '14
  • CarrieA.Belsito

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