and capacities Although they are not diagnostic pulmonary function tests such

And capacities although they are not diagnostic

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and capacities . Although they are not diagnostic, pulmonary function tests such as forced expiratory volume (FEV ) can help a clinician determine the di ff erence between obstructive and restrictive diseases. Speci fi cally, an FEV is the forced volume expired 1 1 1
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28/02/2020, 4 : 49 PM PhysioEx Exercise 7 Activity 1 Page 2 of 6 Stop & Think Questions Experiment Data in 1 second. In obstructive diseases such as chronic bronchitis and asthma, airway radius is decreased. Thus, FEV will Your answer: decrease proportionately. 1 Which muscles contract during quiet expiration? You correctly answered: none of these muscles contract during quiet expiration. 1 Minute ventilation is the amount of air that ows into and then out of the lungs in a minute. Minute ventilation (ml/min) = TV (ml/breath) x BPM (breaths/min). Using the values from the second recorded measurement, enter the minute ventilation. You answered: 7500 ml/min. 2 A useful way to express FEV is as a percentage of the forced vital capacity (FVC). Using the FEV and FVC values from the data grid, calculate the FEV (%) by dividing the FEV volume by the FVC volume (in this case, the VC is equal to the FVC) and multiply by 100%. Enter the FEV (%) for an airway radius of 5.00 mm. You answered: 100 %. 3 1 1 1 1 1 A useful way to express FEV is as a percentage of the forced vital capacity (FVC). Using the FEV and FVC values from the data grid, calculate the FEV (%) by dividing the FEV
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