Promise you make a good point regarding nurses not

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Promise, you make a good point regarding nurses not being respected nowadays, even though I believe the issue is more about trust than respect. Patients rely a lot on their nurses to obtain information they don’t expect to get from anyone else, including their doctors; and, first impression always makes all the difference. I think due to issues such as staffing shortages which increase the nurse-patient ratio, nurses will tend to spend less time with their patients and the quality of care will definitely not be the best; all of which will affect the trust relationship between the nurse and the patient and eventually lead to lack of respect. At my job, they try to assign admission nurses no more than three patients a shift in order to give them adequate time and tools to establish that initial trusting relationship and enhance compliance. Thanks for your post. ------ Re: Topic 1 DQ 1 Its so frustrating when administration is able to provide proper staffing when it makes them look good such the times when an accrediting agency is on site but not when they are absent. It does not take a rocket scientist to know the correlation of safe staffing and patient outcome/satisfaction. Personally, i find the days we are well staffed i am able to provide be best care, educate patients based on their care plan, talk to my patients and care givers, and leave work on time and with a clear mind. we are currently working with our union on a legislative level to bring about safe staffing laws in NY. As a nurse working in the healthcare field, I have seen firsthand the problem that has been presented as a nursing shortage. With few new nurses applicates for my department willing to spend time with their higher degrees at the bedside providing patient care. It is this connection with patients that must be preserved for the future if a balance is to be struck between the goals of cost and quality in health care. This nurse-patient relationship is, of course, the underlying principle of primary nursing. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics (2018) projects 1.1 million additional nurses are needed to avoid a further shortage (Haddad, 2019) . There are several events that have contributed to the nursing shortage in the United States such as our aging baby boomers, health care and educational institutes dealing with expansion to deal with the public’s healthcare needs. Other key factors contributing to this shortage are: the differences in the general work environment compared to past shortages, the ongoing struggle with the image of nursing, recruitment of new nurses, retention of current nurses, and regulatory and policy decisions that can be a barrier to recruitment or a cause of attrition of nurses. Not to mention the aging nursing workforce, low unemployment, and the global nature of this shortage compound the usual factors that contribute to nursing shortages (Haddad, 2019) .

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