B Lanagan Developers in Dartmouth and Edward A Fish owner of Suffolk

B lanagan developers in dartmouth and edward a fish

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 8 pages.

The $22 million project was proposed by James Lanagan of J.B. Lanagan Developers in Dartmouth and  Edward A. Fish, owner of Suffolk Construction in Boston. Fish and Lanagan formed a limited liability corporation called Mattapoisett Housing Associates and filed the application last summer with the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency, the governing body that decides what projects are eligible for 40B development.On Feb. 15, Fish sent a letter to Town Hall that said he was backing out of the project."We understand the town's disappointment with the size and height of the project," Fish wrote.Plans originally called for The Regatta complex to be 52 feet high and include 100 units. More than half of the 9.25-acre lot would have been built on."After considering the concerns of the town, we have decided not to participate with Mr. Lanagan in this development," Fish wrote. "It has been our philosophy that both the developer and community must be in agreement in order to create successful housing."Mattapoisett Housing Associates LLC has been dissolved, which allowed the zoning board to deny the 37-5
Background image
Chapter 37 - Partnerships: Termination and Limited Partnerships permit."With Fish gone, it changes the whole application," Chase said. "The Mattapoisett Housing Associates are the ones who applied for the permit. They no longer exist."Lanagan said he was keeping the purchase and sale agreement on the land. "I understand why Ed Fish backed out. It wasn't working out with the town. But that land will get developed," he said."We fought this project from day one and people assumed that we could do nothing against the 40B law,but that's not true," said Mary Anne Brogan, an opponent of The Regatta. "I never saw that. Now half of the development corporation is gone. Lanagan is all alone.""Maybe everyday citizens' voices count for something after all," said Dan Lee, a leading opponent of the project.In January, David McIntyre Jr., from whom Lanagan had obtained a purchase and sale agreement for the property, which sits between Route 6 and Town Beach, told town officials he wanted the land used for something other than housing.McIntyre, whose family has been in Mattapoisett for generations, said he was concerned about residents' complaints The Regatta was too big for the lot and would cause flooding and beach erosion.On Jan 31, the zoning board fired town counsel Daniel Perry because it thought Perry was too quick to agree to Lanagan's compromise plan to built 76 units instead of 100. The board quickly hired attorney Daniel Hill from the Boston law firm Kopelman & Paige. Hill and the board had just two weeks to reach a decision on The Regatta.
Background image
Image of page 7

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture