The traits influencing intrasexual sexual selection

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7. The trait(s) influencing intrasexual sexual selection is (are): A. black head plume B. green wing color C. cryptic brown body color D. Answers A and B are both correct E. None of these answers is correct 8. Suppose that an experiment (that kept juvenile rearing conditions constant) found that the slope of a plot of a sister’s lifetime survival vs. the size of her brother’s head plume was positive. This finding would indicate that the head plume most probably evolved due to: 9. Suppose that males brood their mate’s eggs and that this brooding behavior is energetically taxing on the males, causing males to sometimes abandon their clutch of eggs. On average, smaller males are more likely to abandon their clutch of eggs, and larger males are more likely to be successful in obtaining a mate. If you found that large males with average brightness of their green wings had mating success equal to that of small males with very bright wings, then which sexual selection model is most likely responsible for the evolution of the bright green wings? EEMB2 Final Salmon Version: 0 Page: 3
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10. Suppose that green-winged babbler is a member of a clade of birds that lack head plumes (except for the green-winged babbler), including species closer to the clade’s root. Experiments show that female attraction to a head plume is a synapomorphy for the clade, but that female preference for this trait is similar in all species. This finding would best support the hypothesis that the head plume evolved via the: Use the following information for the next 5 questions (until you see a solid line): A population of asexual flowers has four genetic variants (genotypes, Y, G, W and R) that code for flower colors that are yellow (Y), green (G), white (W) or red (R). The frequencies of the four types in the spring of 2011 (just before the seeds begin to germinate) were: 100 Y, 200 G, 200 W, and 500 R. The frequencies in 2012 (measured at the same time as 2011) were: 200 Y, 200 G, 100 W, and 1500 R.
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