Reliance on models of economic growth contributes to a top down development

Reliance on models of economic growth contributes to

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Reliance on models of economic growth contributes to a top-down development discourse Kangas, 13 (Laura, Department of Communication, Aalto University, 2013, “The WTO and ambiguous language of development. A rhetorical analysis of the development discourse of the World Trade Organization.”, <? sequence=1>)ZB The neoliberal agenda often gains the status of hegemonic discourse in the discussion on development politics today. Thomas (2004, 458) argues that despite different perspectives on development have been introduced and have ostensibly established their position, they nevertheless haven’t succeeded in actually changing the agenda in the discussion. While mentions of human or sustainable development are nowadays common in discussions the core message eulogizing economic growth still prevails. Also Simon (1997, 4) and Fine (2009, 885) argue that neoliberalism has indisputably enjoyed longstanding dominance especially on account of the power of its institutional advocates. The neoliberal ideology draws squarely on classical economic theories of Adam Smith or David Ricardo: by leaving the job to the invisible hand, the Pareto-optimal outcome will follow and market efficiency will engender development through economic growth.(Chang & Grabel, 2004, 14) The main restriction on an inherent tendency for a free capitalist economy to grow is deemed to be market failure resulting from perverse governmental regulation or other domestic features such as corrupt politicians or rent-seeking bureaucrats. (Hettne, 2008, 9) Major forces such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund were the most vocal proponents of neoliberalism as the best source for economic growth and development all around the world, and in the grounds of this ideology , the highly controversial structural adjustment programmes based on the Washington Consensus, eulogizing free market economy, were introduced in the 1980s to several developing countries. Neoliberalism inherited many aspects from the modernization school, which is why Simon (1997, 184) refers to it as contemporary incarnation of modernization theory. Ideologically not far from Rostow’s (1960) stages of economic growth development is perceived in a top-down linear manner from the western point of view, economic growth given the supreme role in the process . Furthermore, development is deemed as an inherently universal economic process, and the problem of its deficiency is primarily domestic. The reliance on economic growth benefiting the whole society engenders greatly from the concept of trickle-down effect. Even thought merely the elite would benefit from the growth first hand, the prosperity is believed to “trickle down” also to the lower classes in the society, because markets autonomously engender redistribution of economic growth. (Aghion&Bolton, 1997)
Human Rights Link Development projects that claim to uphold human rights inevitably feed back into the development discourse associated with economic ends Kangas, 13

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