Modeling Self Paced and Instructional Approaches A Field Experiment Journal of

Modeling self paced and instructional approaches a

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Modeling, Self-Paced, and Instructional Approaches: A Field Experiment,” Journal of Applied Psychol- ogy 81 (1996): 648–59.
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Chapter 6 Training Evaluation 237 To improve safety, the company developed a training program that taught employees safe behaviors, provided them with incentives for safe behaviors, and encouraged them to monitor their own behavior. To evaluate the program, the design included a comparison group (the Makeup Department) and a trained group (the Wrapping Department). The Makeup Department is responsible for measuring and mixing ingredients, preparing the dough, placing the dough in the oven and removing it when it is cooked, and packag- ing the finished product. The Wrapping Department is responsible for bagging, sealing, and labeling the packaging and stacking it on skids for shipping. Outcomes included observations of safe work behaviors. These observations were taken over a 25-week period. The baseline shows the percentage of safe acts prior to introduction of the safety train- ing program. Training directed at increasing the number of safe behaviors was introduced after approximately five weeks (20 observation sessions) in the Wrapping Department and 10 weeks (50 observation sessions) in the Makeup Department. Training was withdrawn from the Wrapping and Makeup Departments after approximately 62 observation sessions. The withdrawal of training resulted in a reduction of the work incidents performed safely (to pretraining levels). As shown, the number of safe acts observed varied across the obser- vation period for both groups. However, the number of safe behaviors increased after the training program was conducted for the trained group (Wrapping Department). The level of safe acts remained stable across the observation period. (See the intervention period.) When the Makeup Department received training (at 10 weeks, or after 50 observations), a similar increase in the percentage of safe behaviors was observed. Solomon Four-Group The Solomon four-group design combines the pretest/posttest comparison group and the posttest-only control group design. In the Solomon four-group design, a training group and a comparison group are measured on the outcomes both before and after training. Another Percentage of Incidents Performed Safely Observation Sessions 100 90 80 70 60 50 0 100 90 80 70 60 50 0 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 Baseline Intervention Reversal Wrapping Department Makeup Department Percentage of Items Performed Safely by Employees in Two Departments of a Food Manufacturing Plant during a 25-Week Period of Time TABLE 6.10 Example of a Time Series Design Source: J. Komaki, K. D. Badwick, and L. R. Scott, “A Behav- ioral Approach to Occupational Safety: Pinpointing Safe Per- formance in a Food Manufacturing Plant,” Journal of Applied Psychology 63 (1978).
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