14 Session 02 Integrated Pest Management Pesticide use is and will continue to

14 session 02 integrated pest management pesticide

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14
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Session 02: Integrated Pest Management Pesticide use is and will continue to be significant in food and fiber production, forestry, turf and landscape maintenance, and public health. Pest management has shifted from relying heavily on pesticides to using an integrated approach based on pest assessment, decision making, and evaluation. Why Practice IPM? Why have pest managers shifted to IPM when chemical pesticides so often succeed at controlling pests? There are many reasons to broaden pest management beyond the use of chemicals. IPM helps to keep a balanced ecosystem. Every ecosystem, made up of living things and their non-living environment, has a balance; the actions of one kind of organism in the ecosystem usually affect other species. Introducing chemicals into the ecosystem can change this balance, destroying certain species and allowing other species (sometimes pests themselves) to dominate. Pesticides can kill beneficial insects that consume pests, leaving few natural mechanisms of pest control. Pesticides can be ineffective. Chemical pesticides are not always effective. Pests can become resistant to pesticides. In fact, some 600 cases of pests developing pesticide resistance have been documented to date, including many common weeds, insects, and disease-causing fungi. Furthermore, pests may survive in situations where the chemical does not reach pests, is washed off, is applied at an improper rate, or is applied at an improper life stage of the pest. IPM can save money. IPM can avoid crop loss caused by pests and prevent unnecessary pesticide expense. Applicators can save on pesticide costs because the need for control, rather than routine application triggered by the calendar, is the basis for applying pesticides. IPM promotes a healthy environment. We have much to learn about the persistence of chemicals in the environment and their effect on living creatures. Cases of contaminated groundwater appear each year, and disposal of containers and unused pesticides still pose challenges for applicators. Make sure that environmental impacts are considered in any 15
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Unit 4 pest management decisions. Using IPM strategies helps keep adverse effects to a minimum IPM maintains a good public image. IPM is now demanded by many sectors of our society. IPM has been implemented to grow our food, to manage turf and ornamentals, to protect home and business structures, to manage school grounds, and to protect humans, pets, and livestock health. Components of an Integrated Pest Management Program Planning is at the heart of an IPM program. Every crop has pests that need to be considered. If you wait until problems arise during a growing season, you’ll end up relying on pesticides more and more. A good Integrated Pest Management program has three components: 1) identifying and monitoring pest problems; 2) selecting the best pest management tactics; 3) record keeping and evaluating the program.
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