Mechanized assassination further permeates the infusion of violence within the

Mechanized assassination further permeates the

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Mechanized assassination further permeates the infusion of violence within the world’s peaceable zones of relative safety, a general effect of twenty-first century warfare that is evidenced by the secret practices of overhead, and underwear, bombers alike . [6] In a paradoxical sense, the call for global civil society comes at a historical moment when sociability itself has become a newly invigorated paramilitary Operational Area (AO). Here intra-state violence supercedes , while appearing to compliment, the more primitive mode of making war in a geographically coherent national mode. [7] Put in bumper sticker speak: really, “freedom isn’t free.” Thus a continued (rather, a continuous ) “ Revolution in Military Affairs ” (RMA), to cite Defense Secretary Robert Gates, ushers in a “new reality…for America, and for humanity [insofar as] the lines separating war [and] peace…have become more blurred ” (5; emphasis mine). At stake in this blurring between war and peace , which Gates rightly extends to the existence of anything we might go on calling the human, is an innovative set of techno-environmental insecurities that are arguably effacing—at different levels and with different speeds—the coherency of the state and of the state’s anthropomorphic referents in any of humanity’s ethical guise s (read here: left-liberal notions of the human being and right-wing possessive individualism, alike). Twenty-first century war doctrine regards population control, race and ethnic division, the manipulation of computerized knowledge systems, deliberate and non-deliberate manifestations of environmental modification (ENMOD ), epidemic disease, and resource scarcity as commonly intertwined within a complex set of super- surfaces that mutate almost too fast to be described (Tactics A-4). What is new, a 2009 US Army Strategic Studies Institute paper insists, “is that climate change poses security threats unmatched among environmental phenomena (Parsons 2). And what is radically new is that climate change represents a relatively untapped means for engaging in war, “a unique and promising opportunity for the United States…to advance its security interests ” (Parsons 7). The explicit referenc e in this citation is to competing US-China interests in Sub-Saharan Africa, the rush to grab oil, natural gas, and other commodities; but think , implicitly, of hurricane Katrina as the preemptive first strike in a planetary civil war that no one has officially declared. In this “new” ecology of war (the scare quotes are meant to mark extremities of chronology, breaks, as well as compressions and expansions in the experience of time), the epistemo-military arts are developing techniques that incorporate a symbiosis of agencies—biological, atmospheric, geological, and mechanical—that from any other perspective than war would be revealed as the suicidal miscellany of a planet abandoned to siege.
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