Chinese ships then have to traverse the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea to

Chinese ships then have to traverse the indian ocean

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the Persian Gulf. After that, they have to return to China via the same route. Chinese leaders will surely want to control these sea lines of communication, just as the United States emphasizes the importance of controlling its primary sea routes. Thus, it is hardly surprising thatthere is widespread support in China for building a blue-water navy, which would allow China to project power around the world and control its main sea lines of communication. In brief, if China continues its rapid economic growth, it
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will almost certainly become a superpower, which means it will build the power-projection capability necessary to compete with the United States around the globe.The two areas to which it is likely to pay the greatest attention are the Western Hemisphere and the Persian Gulf, although Africa will also be of marked importance to Beijing. In addition, China will undoubtedly try to build military and naval forces that would allow it to reach those distant regions, much the way the United States has pursued sea control.US leadership prevents extinction – it accesses every impactDobriansky, 15 - Paula J. Dobriansky served as under secretary of state for global affairs from 2001 to 2009. She is a senior fellow with the Future of Diplomacy Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. (“We Asked Paula J. Dobriansky: What Should Be the Purpose of American Power?” The National Interest, 8/25, -paula-j-dobriansky-what-should-be-the-purpose-13678The purpose of American power, which includes military, economic, diplomatic, ideological, legal and cultural components, is to protect the entire range of our national-security interests. While we face many pressing domestic challenges, America cannot afford to focus on them alone. Americans cannot be secureand prosperous without a stable, rule-driven international order. Terrorism, refugee flows,pandemic diseases, pollution, cyberattacks, economic decay,nuclear proliferation and military aggression can directly threaten our securityand prosperity even when they arise overseas.We cannot handle these threats successfully in an ad hoc fashion. American power must be continuously applied to maintain political, military and economic international institutionsand alliances that, with effective U.S. leadership, can safeguard global stability, economicgrowth and the rule of law. This does not mean that every foreign dispute or fight concerns us. But we must counter fundamental assaults on the existing global liberal order.This task is particularly crucial today, since thepost–Cold War international framework is under attack bynumerous challenges, including Islamic fundamentalism, growing Sunni-Shia strife, Iran’s efforts to acquire nuclear weaponsand become the preeminent power in the Middle East, Russian revanchism, and China’s efforts to exercise dominion over Asiaand strong-arm its neighbors.
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