Smith pp 483 501 Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press Styles B 2011 Animal

Smith pp 483 501 smithsonian institution scholarly

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 7 pages.

Smith., pp. 483-501. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press. Styles, B. 2011 “Animal use by Holocene Aboriginal Societies of the Northeast.” In Subsistence Economies of Indigenous North American Societies: A Handbook., edited by B. D. Smith., pp. 483-501. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press. Course Format: The Field Archaeology and Geophysical Testing program is primarily conducted onsite at the Mound House site, except for rain days. Evening sessions are held in the laboratory, processing collected archaeological materials. These activities are supplements by lectures and independent research projects. Course Schedule Attendance is required for all class meetings, meals, and lectures. A typical day (M-F) in the Field Archaeology and Geophysical Testing track runs as follows (subject to change): 6:15 AM Meet for Breakfast 8:00-10:00 AM Fieldwork 10:00-10:15 AM Break 10:15 AM-12:30 PM Fieldwork 12:30-1:15 PM Lunch 1:15-4:30 PM Fieldwork 5:00-5:30 PM Dinner 6:00-7:00 PM Break 7:00-9:00 PM Labwork, Lecture, or Projects Saturdays are half days (6:15 AM-12:00 PM) for labwork or project time. Fieldwork start and end times will vary slightly depending on travel time. Coursework Final grades for the course will be assigned on basis of the following: Technical Skill (20%): Students should demonstrate mastery of basic field methods (e.g. shovel and trowel technique, measurement accuracy, soil description, data recording) to receive full points for this portion of the grade. This portion of the grade is evaluated through direction observation of students’ execution of field tasks.
Image of page 3
Efficiency (20%): Students should show the ability to execute field and laboratory tasks in an efficient manner as they begin to master technical skills. This portion of the grade is evaluated through direction observation of students’ execution of field tasks. Interpretation (20%): Students should demonstrate that they understand the cultural implications of the sediments excavated, material culture, and their contexts. Evaluation of interpretative ability occurs through students’ completion of field recording forms, which are reviewed for completion and accuracy by all field staff, and then discussed with students to correct any errors or omissions. Upon review by field staff, students will be given the opportunity to improve and/or correct forms as necessary. Attitude (20%): The overall success of any field project depends upon group effort. Students contribute to a successful field season through cooperation, taking the initiative to ensure work proceeds efficiently, and maintaining a positive attitude. This portion of the grade is evaluated through direction observation of students’ execution of field tasks. Project (20%): Each student will engage in an independent, instructor-approved research project that incorporates information from readings, lectures, and excavation experience. Students are expected to submit a project abstract for instructor approval. Approved projects address an archaeological question. The completed project is a 12-15 minutes conference-style presentation to the field school during the last week.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture