Spent 83 cents of every entertainment dollar going to

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spent 83 cents of every entertainment dollar going to the movies--and three-fourths of the population went to  a movie theater every week.  During the late teens and 1920s, the film industry took on its modern form. In cinema's earliest days, the film  industry was based in the nation's theatrical center--New York. By the 1920s, the industry had relocated in  Hollywood, drawn by cheap land and labor, the ready accessibility of varied scenery, and a climate ideal for  year-round filming. (Some filmmakers moved to avoid lawsuits from individuals like Thomas Edison who  owned patent rights over the filmmaking process.) Each year, Hollywood released nearly 700 movies,  dominating worldwide film production. By 1926, Hollywood had captured 95 of the British market and 70  percent of the French.  A small group of companies consolidated their control over the film industry and created film the "studio  system" that would dominate film production for the next thirty years. Paramount, 20th Century Fox, and  MGM and other studios owned their own production facilities, ran their own worldwide distribution networks,  and controlled theater chains committed to showing their companies' products. In addition, they kept stables  of actors, directors, and screenwriters under contract.  The popularity of the movies soared as films increasingly featured glamour, sophistication, and sex appeal.  New kinds of movie stars appeared: the mysterious sex goddess, personified by Greta Garbo; the  passionate hotblooded lover, epitomized by Rudolph Valentino; and the flapper, with her bobbed hair and  skimpy skirts. New film genres also debuted, including swashbuckling adventures, sophisticated sex  comedies, and tales of flaming youth and the new sexual freedom. Americans flocked to see Hollywood  spectacles such as Cecil B. DeMille's Ten Commandments with its "cast of thousands" and dazzling special 
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