6 adjust the power supply so that about 05 a will

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6. Adjust the power supply so that about 0.5 A will flow through the coil when the switch is closed. 7. Click to begin data collection. Close the switch for at least 10 seconds during the data collection. 8. View the field vs . time graph and determine the region of the curve where the current was flowing in the wire. Select this region on the graph by dragging over it. Determine the average field strength while the current was on by clicking on the Statistics button, . Record the average field in the data table. 9. Increase the current by about 0.5 A and repeat Steps 7 and 8. Zero the sensor each time. 10. Repeat Step 9 up to a maximum of 2.0 A. 11. Count the number of turns of the Slinky and measure its length. If you have any unstretched part of the Slinky at the ends, do not count it for either the turns or the length. Calculate the number of turns per meter of the stretched portion. Record the length, turns, and the number of turns per meter in the data table. Analysis: 1. Plot a graph of magnetic field B vs . the current I through the solenoid. You can use New Manual Columns in Logger Pro (or close and reopen Logger Pro with the sensor disconnected) to help prepare the graph. 2. How is magnetic field qualitatively related to the current through the solenoid? 3. Determine the equation of the best-fit line, including the y -intercept. Note the constants and their units.
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Part II: How is the Magnetic Field in a Solenoid Related to the Spacing of the Turns? For the second part of the experiment, you will determine the relationship between the magnetic field in the center of a coil and the number of turns of wire per meter of the solenoid. You will keep the current constant. Leave the Slinky set up as shown in Figure 1. The sensor will be oriented as it was before, so that it measures the field down the middle of the solenoid. You will be changing the length of the Slinky from 0.5 to 1.5 m to change the number of turns per meter. 1. Adjust the power supply so that the current will be 1.5 A when the switch is closed. 2. With the Magnetic Field Sensor in position, but no current flowing, click to zero the sensor and remove readings due to the Earth’s magnetic field and any magnetism in the metal of the Slinky. Since the Slinky is made of an iron alloy, it can be magnetized itself. Moving the Slinky around can cause a change in the field, even if no current is flowing. This means
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