1 curious nosy interested 2 lazy relaxed slow 3

This preview shows page 156 - 159 out of 600 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Enhanced Microsoft Office 2013: Illustrated Fundamentals
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter UF / Exercise 4
Enhanced Microsoft Office 2013: Illustrated Fundamentals
Cram/Duffy
Expert Verified
1. curious, nosy, interested 2. lazy, relaxed, slow 3. courageous, foolhardy, assured 4. new, newfangled, modern 5. mansion, shack, residence 6. spinster, unmarried woman, career woman 7. giggle, laugh, cackle 8. boring, routine, prosaic 9. noted, notorious, famous 10. assertive, confident, pushy Positive Negative Neutral 148 WRITING FOR SUCCESS
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Enhanced Microsoft Office 2013: Illustrated Fundamentals
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter UF / Exercise 4
Enhanced Microsoft Office 2013: Illustrated Fundamentals
Cram/Duffy
Expert Verified
Positive Negative Neutral Avoiding Slang Slang describes informal words that are considered nonstandard English. Slang often changes with passing fads and may be used by or familiar to only a specific group of people. Most people use slang when they speak and in personal correspondences, such as e-mails, text messages, and instant messages. Slang is appropriate between friends in an informal context but should be avoided in formal academic writing. Writing at Work Frequent exposure to media and popular culture has desensitized many of us to slang. In certain situations, using slang at work may not be problematic, but keep in mind that words can have a powerful effect. Slang in professional e-mails or during meetings may convey the wrong message or even mistakenly offend someone. Exercise 2 Edit the following paragraph by replacing the slang words and phrases with more formal language. Rewrite the paragraph on your own sheet of paper. I felt like such an airhead when I got up to give my speech. As I walked toward the podium, I banged my knee on a chair. Man, I felt like such a klutz. On top of that, I kept saying “like” and “um,” and I could not stop fidgeting. I was so stressed out about being up there. I feel like I’ve been practicing this speech 24/7, and I still bombed. It was ten minutes of me going off about how we sometimes have to do things we don’t enjoy doing. Wow, did I ever prove my point. My speech was so bad I’m surprised that people didn’t boo. My teacher said not to sweat it, though. Everyone gets nervous his or her first time speaking in public, and she said, with time, I would become a whiz at this speech giving stuff. I wonder if I have the guts to do it again. Collaboration Please share with a classmate and compare your answers. 4.3 WORD CHOICE • 149
Avoiding Clichés Clichés are descriptive expressions that have lost their effectiveness because they are overused. Writing that uses clichés often suffers from a lack of originality and insight. Avoiding clichés in formal writing will help you write in original and fresh ways. Clichéd: Whenever my brother and I get into an argument, he always says something that makes my blood boil . Plain: Whenever my brother and I get into an argument, he always says something that makes me really angry. Original: Whenever my brother and I get into an argument, he always says something that makes me want to go to the gym and punch the bag for a few hours.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture