America the restorer by looking at american

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that will be discussed later in the essay. America the Restorer By looking at American reconstruction plans in chronological order, starting with the Fourteen Points (1919) and ending with French reconstruction (1968), we can see how America’s role as the Restorer came about and how this role evolved. Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points, issued at the end of World War I, was intended to restore peace
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to Europe and prevent the occurrence of another world war. Thus, these Fourteen Points signify America’s role as the Restorer of peace and economic stability. However, some points have shades of imperialism, for they only cater towards American economic interests. For example, point number II reads “Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war” (Wilson, 159). The concept of freedom of the sees primarily benefits the US, since America has the largest trade industry. Therefore, beginning with post World War I restoration in 1919, America already took advantage of their role as the Restorer by employing policies that were intended to benefit themselves. Another reconstruction plan that satisfied American economic interests was the Marshall Plan. The mass destruction of World War II left Europe in ruin, so the United States issued the Marshall Plan in 1947 to foster European growth and recovery (Sheehan, The War in Europe , 4/25/02). However, the Marshall Plan helped the US economy as well, for the money loaned by the US to European countries was used to purchase goods from the US. Once again, America found a way to act as the Restorer of the economy while also satisfying her own economic interests. Where can we draw the line between American reconstruction and American imperialist expansion? America continued its monopolistic expansion in Europe, particularly France, well after the adoption of the Marshall Plan. Servan-Schreiber, in his book The American Challenge , denounces American economic investments in France from a cultural and technological standpoint. He accepts the fact that America has played the part of the Restorer by restoring French industry; however, Servan-Schreiber argues that American investments have turned monopolistic and evolved into imperialist
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expansion, for these investments restrained French creativity, technology, and culture. He writes, “A nation holding a monopoly of power would look on imperialism as a kind of duty, and would take its own success as proof that the rest of the world should follow its example” (Schreiber, 102). Servan-Schreiber explains America’s actions by stating, “It is a historical rule that politically and economically powerful countries make direct investments (and gain control) in less-developed countries” (Schreiber, 12). Therefore, American interests in France during the 1960’s present a type of imperialism that exploited French resources during their time of reconstruction. In general, American foreign policy crossed the line between helpful reconstruction (the Restorer) and harmful imperialist expansion (the Imperialist).
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