2013 According Kaminski et al 2013 ankle sprains are a very common injury that

2013 according kaminski et al 2013 ankle sprains are

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background information regarding ankle sprains (Kaminski et al., 2013). According Kaminski et al. (2013), ankle sprains are a very common injury that can affect all aged athletes and in all sporting activities, and about 45% of athlete related injuries are ankle sprains. This isn’t information that comes as a surprise to me because this isn't the first time that I have heard that ankle sprains are a very common injury. While I was working with Eastern Michigan Football all of the players were required to have either their ankles taped or have ankle braces on both ankles at practice and games to help prevent these types of injuries. Also within this journal it states that basketball and jumping are both high risk for ankle sprains (Kaminski et al. 2013). This was interesting to me considering those were two main factors in the injury that I had observed in my athlete. With knowing that I wanted to know more as to why inversion ankle sprains were so common. When searching for answers as to why ankle sprains were so common I had hit a dead end because no journal could really give me a set answer to this question. However, I finally came across a article written about the history of ankle sprains. Walters (2006) stated, “ The inversion sprain is more common than the eversion sprain because of the bony anatomy on the lateral side of the ankle, which tends to limit eversion”. After reading this I was looking up pictures of the ankle anatomy HealthyJoints.net and this makes sense considering that on the lateral side of the ankle it has several different ligaments compared to the one big medial ligament. . The main ligaments on the lateral side of the ankle include: posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). As for the
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INVERSION ANKLE SPRAIN 8 medial side, there is only one ligament called the deltoid ligament that breaks off into three different parts. These parts include, posterior tibiotalar, tibionavicular, and tibiocalcaneal, which all connect to the medial malleolus which is at the bottom of the tibia. The medial malleolus acts like a hook for the deltoid ligament to attach too. This is why it makes it so hard for your ankle to sprain everson or on the medial side because the medial ligaments are more secure then the lateral ligaments. The lateral ligaments also act as part of the mechanism of injury in the inversion ankle sprain. A inversion ankle sprain has quite a few mechanisms of injury due to the fact it is a common injury so there are several ways that this injury can occur. According to Wolfe (2001), in her journal regarding management of ankle sprains, she says that the most common mechanism of injury is a combination of plantar flexion and inversion. With that Wolfe (2001) also talks about how the three lateral ligaments (PTFL, ATFL, CFL) are all usually all that is damaged in this injury. This ankle sprain is broken up into three grades that specify the severity of the damage of these ligaments. An article written by Haddad (2016) breaks down the three degrees very well. He says the first degree (mild) involves a slight stretch of ligaments with mild tenderness and swelling. The second degree (moderate) involves partial tearing of ligaments with
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  • Spring '14
  • JamesJ.Sweet
  • ankle sprains, inversion ankle sprain

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