We highlight one of the key changes for newer patents in th the paragraph below

We highlight one of the key changes for newer patents

This preview shows page 41 - 43 out of 46 pages.

after March 15, 2013. We highlight one of the key changes for newer patents in this section, in  the paragraph below on novel inventions. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office grants patents. To be patentable, an invention must  meet several basic criteria.  First, it must  be the right kind of subject matter.  Machines, man- made materials, products, and processes can be patented. One cannot patent natural materials  (wood, iron, oxygen, etc) or scientific principles (E = mc 2 ). The line between natural and  invented is often blurry, especially in the world of the very small.   Association for Molecular  Pathology v. Myriad Genetics  presents the Supreme Court's very current view on the  patentability of human genes. Software also creates some thorny issues, as do attempts to  patent business methods. Second, an item must have utility or accomplish something useful.  However, it does not have to  be  very  useful (many toys and novelty items of quite limited societal value have been patented). Third, an invention cannot be obvious or more than a trivial change to an existing invention. Fourth, an invention must be novel, that is, one that is not currently in use and that has not been detailed in print.  The rules for novelty can become complicated when two inventors develop  something in a similar timeframe. These rules have recently changed under the AIA. Generally,  the United States has switched from a first-to-invent to a first-to-file system. Before the AIA,  courts focused on when something was first invented. Now, the focus is on who wins the race to the patent office. But, certain kinds of disclosures give original inventors a one-year grace  period before others can file for patents on their inventions. The assigned reading presents  several examples. Key Concept 7: When has a defendant infringed a patent and what are the plaintiff’s remedies Securing a patent can be quite costly in terms of time, money, and effort. The point of taking the trouble, of course,  is gaining the ability to stop competitors from making use of your invention,  process, or material for a period of 20 years. Literal infringement cases are straightforward. If a defendant makes a product that copies all  claims in a plaintiff's patent, then a clear violation has occurred. But what if a defendant's  product copies only some parts of a patent claim? In such cases, a court will apply the doctrine  of equivalents as described in  Larami Corporation v. Alan Amron  (the "Super Soaker case"). Whether plaintiffs win by demonstrating a literal infringement or by using the doctrine of  equivalents, they are entitled to an injunction and damages. Damages can be substantial and  can cover lost profits and royalties on the defendant's sales. If a defendant deliberately infringes on a patent, then a judge may treble the plaintiff's damages and force the defendant's to pay the plaintiff's attorney's fees.
Image of page 41
Image of page 42
Image of page 43

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture