Major deities but instead of attempting to change

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major deities,” but instead of attempting to change their entire belief system to the Inca state religion, they “simply added the Inca gods to their own set of gods and spirits.” 26 Their religion 25 "Inca Religion, Arts, and Sciences," in Early Civilizations in the Americas Reference Library , edited by Sonia G. Benson, Sarah Hermsen, and Deborah J. Baker, 199-220. Vol. 1, Almanac, Vol. 1. (Detroit: UXL, 2005), accessed Oct 3, 2017, World History in Context, ? gwurl=. 26 "Inca Religion, Arts, and Sciences," in Early Civilizations in the Americas Reference Library .
centered around the god Viracocha, who created the earth, and Inti, the sun god, who created the first Incas. While the Incas were polytheistic, the Asian dynasties of Zhou in China and Silla in Korea were monotheistic. Buddhism and Confucianism were two schools of thought which came about during the Zhou Dynasty, and continued forward in time to the Unified Silla. Buddhism was made popular in Korea in the 7 th century CE by the Buddhist scholar-monk Wonyho, and was the “official state religion, practiced by all levels of society.” 27 One of the Buddhist temples built during the Unified Silla is still standing today – the Bulguksa Temple near Gyeongju, South Korea – and is also a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site. According to the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History, “some of the most refined 27 Mark Cartwright, “Unified Silla Kingdom,” Ancient History Encyclopedia , last modified Oct 6, 2016, accessed Sep 20, 2017, .
Figure 3. “Standing Buddha.” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY. and sophisticated Buddhist art and architecture in East Asia is produced in Korea during this period.” 28 Figures 3 and 4 support this, as the detail and beauty of these bronze and gold Buddha’s shine. Ancient societies had different ways of record keeping, from tracking taxes collected, trade goods and food supplies, as well as events, ceremonies and government policies. The Incas 28 “Korea, 500–1000 A.D,” In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History , New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–, (October 2001), accessed Oct 3, 2017, . Figure 4. Unified Silla Kingdom Gold Buddha National Museum of Korea, Seoul, South Korea
had no formal mathematical system, but instead kept track of all kinds of information with a quipu (Fig. 5): “Quipu consisted of an array of small cords of various colors and lengths, all suspended from one large, thick cord. Experts tied a series of knots in the small cords, which sometimes number a hundred or more, to help them remember certain kinds of information. Most quipu recorded statistical information having to do with population, state property, taxes, and labor services that communities owed to the central government. Occasionally, though, quipu also helped experts

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