After a file is stored the user can use finder to

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the file is stored in folders, and normally, saved to the C: drive. After a file is stored, the user can use Finder to locate the file(s). Finder is Mac’s equivalent to the Windows Explore on Windows OS; however, they have a noticeably different look. When accessing Finder, the default file folders will appear in a window. With Mac, (unless the user is creating a file on the desktop), any open or downloaded files will be saved to a specific default location unless otherwise specified. File management between Windows and Mac is not that different with the exception of the look and default file folders. While Windows and Mac file management is very similar, Linux is much different. Many say Linux is a system based off UNIX, but this is not true. However, they both douse an inverted tree structure to organize the files on the operating system called the “inverted tree.” This is because the file path for Linux is backward; hence, the name inverted (upside-down) tree structure. Linux is not user friendly like Windows or Mac. Actually, it is far from it because when a file it is saved within a directory. Windows and Mac OS’s have what they call folders and the folders have files stored in them. In Linux, these folders are called directories, (as mentioned earlier). Memory management, process management and file management are three very important elements of all operating systems. However, if a system is not secure, all of those systems will be irrelevant. Security 7
RUNNING HEADER: Unix®, Linux®, Mac OS®, Windows® Operating Systems Comparison The operating system’s main focus is to support and provide confidentiality, integrity, and availability to the user. The understanding of proactive configuration to safeguard an asset from potential threats is an overview of OS security for the following: Linux Unix Windows As presumed from the Lindskog’s Thesis on Observations on Operating System Security Vulnerabilities, segregating the processes between the kernel mode, in which processes are executed by the kernel, and user mode, initiation of program executable processes by the user, is the best practice for the safeguard of user accessibility to proper data. OS vulnerabilities are not always the presumed ignorance of compromising access controls, which will be discussed more in depth in conjunction with OS threat mitigation. Each operating system has a standard to which processes and resources can be performed. This standard is also known as, mandatory security, and defined by Jaeger as, “a protection state that defines the operations that a fixed set of subject labels can perform on a fixed set of object labels—a labeling state that maps system processes and resources to their subject and object labels respectively” (2008). By defining the authority of the operating system, you are able to enforce the protection standards by way of mandatory security.

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